412
412

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, SAN FRANCISCO

Auguste Rodin
LA GÉNIE DU REPOS ÉTERNEL, AGRANDISSEMENT OU GRAND MODÈLE 
Estimate
150,000200,000
LOT SOLD. 225,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
412

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, SAN FRANCISCO

Auguste Rodin
LA GÉNIE DU REPOS ÉTERNEL, AGRANDISSEMENT OU GRAND MODÈLE 
Estimate
150,000200,000
LOT SOLD. 225,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Auguste Rodin
1840 - 1917
LA GÉNIE DU REPOS ÉTERNEL, AGRANDISSEMENT OU GRAND MODÈLE 
Inscribed A. Rodin, dated © By. Musée Rodin 1985, numbered 4/8 and stamped with the Coubertin foundry mark
Bronze 
Height: 76 in.
193 cm
Conceived circa 1899-1902 and cast in an edition of 12 numbered 0-8/8 and I/III-III/III between 1981-1996 by the Coubertin Foundry; this example cast in October 1985. 
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This work will be included in the forthcoming Catalogue Critique de l'Oeuvre Sculpté d'Auguste Rodin being currently prepared by Galerie Brame & Lorenceau under the direction of Jérôme Le Blay under the archive number 2018-5730B. 

Provenance

Musée Rodin, Paris 
Bruton Gallery, New York (acquired from the above in November 1987)
Acquired from the above circa 1990

Literature

Camille Mauclair, Auguste Rodin: The Man, His Ideas, His Works, London, 1909, pp. 89-90
Frederick Lawton, François-Auguste Rodin, New York, 1908, illustration of another cast p. 156
Antoinette Le Normand-Romain, The Bronzes of Rodin, Catalogue of Works in the Musée Rodin, vol. II, Paris, 2007, no. S.794, illustrations of another cast p. 395

Catalogue Note

While most of his contemporaries had living "masters" to educate them and nurture their development, Rodin instead chose Michelangelo as his absent master. In 1876, Rodin made his first voyage to Florence to study the Italian's work directly. The immediate impression was unexpected, as Rodin himself recalled: “When I myself went to Italy, my brain full of Greek models that I had passionately studied at the Louvre, I was greatly disconcerted by the Michelangelos. They were always refuting all the truths I thought I’d permanently learned!" (quoted in Raphael Masson & Veronique Mattiussi, Rodin, Paris, 2004, p. 151).

Michelangelo’s art inspired in Rodin a sense of freedom that contradicted the classical canons of the time. Rodin himself had no intuitive affinity with the academic school of art: he had been rejected from the École des Beaux-Arts three times prior to his trip to Italy. His first encounter with the physical models of Michelangelo was therefore formative, not only liberating him from the preconceptions of his studies but inspiring him with a new kind of visual vocabulary: “The emotional quality of the modeling, the tormented poses, and the throbbing power that stemmed directly from Michelangelo’s non finito technique reassured Rodin, even as they revealed new paths to explore" (ibid., p. 151). Though inspired by Michelangelo, over the course of his long career Rodin created his own distinctive visual idiom that was to transform modern sculpture whilst still at times referencing the old.

The present model is exemplary of Rodin’s imaginative versatility in its numerous references. La Génie du repos éternel, which appears to be at the point of losing its balance, is a direct reference to The Spirit of Eternal Repose located in the Louvre and Skopas’s figure of Pothos (see fig. 1). 

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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