396
396
Marc Chagall
NU AU CYCLAMEN, GSTAAD
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 519,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
396
Marc Chagall
NU AU CYCLAMEN, GSTAAD
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 519,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Marc Chagall
1887 - 1985
NU AU CYCLAMEN, GSTAAD
Signed Chagall Marc (lower right)
Gouache, pastel, crayon and brush and ink on paper
25 1/8 by 19 3/4 in.
63.8 by 50.4 cm
Executed in 1971. 
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The authenticity of this work has kindly been confirmed by the Comité Chagall.

Provenance

Private Collection, New York (acquired circa 1975)
Private Collection, New York (by descent from the above and sold: Christie's, New York, May 5, 2011, lot 173)
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Exhibited

New York, Pierre Matisse Gallery, Marc Chagall, Paintings and Gouaches, 1972, no. 12, illustrated in color in the catalogue

Catalogue Note

In Nu au cyclamen, Gstaad Chagall revisits the theme of romance, depicting a beautiful interior with lovers humbled in the presence of their passion for each other. During the early 1970s, Chagall was based in Saint-Paul-de-Vence, which became his permanent home until his death. Gstaad, a town in the Swiss Alps, served as a picturesque escape from the bustle of an urban ambience. The snow-covered Alps appear in the window of Nu au cyclamen, Gstaad, offset by the pot of white flowers near the lower right corner.

André Verdet writes of Chagall’s relationship to flowers: “Marc Chagall loved flowers. He delighted in their aroma, in contemplating their colours... There were always flowers in his studio. In his work bouquets of flowers held a special place... Usually they created a sense of joy, but they could also reflect the melancholy of memories” (quoted in Jacob Baal-Teshuva, ed., Chagall: A Retrospective, Fairfield, 1995, p. 347). 

Romance is a recurring theme within Chagall’s oeuvre and is often a reference to Chagall’s first wife, Bella. Although Bella unexpectedly passed away in 1944, she continued serve as Chagall’s primary muse. When Chagall married Bella, he was met with hesitancy from Bella’s family who preferred that she marry someone with more stable income. Their relationship was special as it represents the true expression of love—the willingness to cross societal norms for lifelong affection. The passion between the lovers depicted in Nu au cyclamen, Gstaad is representative of that special love—one which followed him wherever he traveled (see fig. 1).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York