393
393

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, FLORIDA

Henry Moore
MAQUETTE FOR SEATED WOMAN
Estimate
200,000300,000
JUMP TO LOT
393

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, FLORIDA

Henry Moore
MAQUETTE FOR SEATED WOMAN
Estimate
200,000300,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Henry Moore
1898 - 1986
MAQUETTE FOR SEATED WOMAN
Bronze
Height (not including base): 6 5/8 in.
16.8 cm
Conceived in 1956 and cast in an edition of 9.
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Provenance

Waddington Galleries, London
Irving Galleries, Palm Beach
Acquired from the above

Literature

Alan Bowness, ed., Henry Moore Sculpture and Drawings, Sculpture 1955-64, vol. 3, London, 1965, no. 434, illustrated p. 26

Catalogue Note

The human figure was Henry Moore’s abiding passion and the primary subject of his art. Maquette for Seated Woman, conceived in 1956, is model of one of his most important works, belonging to a series of sculptures of women that Moore created in the 1950s that occupy a key position in his oeuvre.

The seated figure as a theme emerged as part of Moore’s commission to make a sculpture to sit outside UNESCO’s headquarters. The project presented Moore with a particular sculptural conundrum that he initially tried to solve using his usual configurations of family groups or solo female figures. While he found the eventual solution in the highly abstracted form of a reclining female figure, numerous maquettes show that he had seriously considered using a seated figure such as the present work.

Discussing Seated Woman, Moore recalled a memory of his own mother: “Seated Woman, particularly her back view, kept reminding me of my mother, whose back I used to rub as a boy when she was suffering from rheumatism. She had a strong, solid figure, and I remember, as I massaged her with some embarrassment, the sensation it gave me going across her shoulder blades and then down and across the backbone. I had the sense of an expanse of flatness yet within it a hard projection of bone” (quoted in Will Grohmann, The Art of Henry Moore, London, 1960, p. 329).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York