333
333

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, LOS ANGELES

Jean Arp
APPARAT D'UNE DANSE
JUMP TO LOT
333

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, LOS ANGELES

Jean Arp
APPARAT D'UNE DANSE
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Jean Arp
1886 - 1966
APPARAT D'UNE DANSE
Numbered 0/2 (on the interior)
Bronze 
Height: 91 1/4 in.
231.8 cm
Conceived in 1961 and cast in an edition of 2 plus an artist's proof numbered 0/2.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Hokin Gallery, Inc., Chicago (acquired directly from the artist)
Private Collection, Massachusetts (acquired from the above in 1982 and sold: Sotheby's, New York, November 6, 2002, lot 294)
Private Collection, California (acquired at the above sale)
Thence by descent

Literature

Eduard Trier, Marguerite Arp-Hagenbach & François Arp, Jean Arp, Sculpture, His Last Ten Years, New York, 1968, no. 216A, illustration of another cast p. 113
Arie Hartog & Kai Fischer, Hans Arp, Sculptures, A Critical Survey, Bonn, 2012, no. 216A, illustration of another cast p. 155

Catalogue Note

Jean Arp's most successful sculptures are characterized by their unblemished surfaces and smooth curvilinear forms. Since his involvement with Dada and Surrealism in the 1920s and 1930s and until the end of his life, the elegant beauty of Arp's sculpture was increasingly analyzed in terms of spirituality. Recognized throughout his career for his ability to transcend formal boundaries and create works of art that could be interpreted differently depending upon a given viewer's needs and expectations, Arp is notable for his ability to appeal to a wide audience. At the heart of Arp's success is the organic beauty of his sculptures, which seem to manifest from a vision unencumbered by any formal constraints.

Arp's mastery of biomorphic form led to his incorporation of human figural elements into his abstracted sculptures in his last decade. Arp frequently compared the practice of artistic production within that of biological creation, both of which are intimately embodied by Apparat d'une danse. The artist held a particular interest in the natural world, which he aimed to “create” rather than “describe,” as was common in the tradition of naturalism. Furthermore, “Arp’s interest in nature was also directed at what he perceived to be the basic forces and principles underlying nature, the forces of growth and transformation” (Margherita Andreotti, The Early Sculpture of Jean Arp, Ann Arbor, 1989, p. 259). This proved particularly innovative within the medium of sculpture which had long been dominated by naturalistic representations of the human form.

In the present work, a bifurcated human figure gesticulates into motion, leaping unmistakably into a jubilant dance. An example of Arp's most accomplished work, Apparat d'une danse brings natural form into dazzling movement in the world, exemplifying the artist's overarching approach of continually "looking" into the present day. 

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York