332
332

PROPERTY OF A LADY

Jean Arp
TORSE-FRUIT
Estimate
250,000350,000
LOT SOLD. 312,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
332

PROPERTY OF A LADY

Jean Arp
TORSE-FRUIT
Estimate
250,000350,000
LOT SOLD. 312,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Jean Arp
1886 - 1966
TORSE-FRUIT
Numbered II/X and stamped with the raised initials HA (on the interior)

Bronze
Height: 14 5/8 in.
37.2 cm
Conceived and cast in 1960 in an edition of 10 by Georges Rudier, Paris.
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Provenance

Private Collection, France
Jeffrey H. Loria & Co., New York 
Acquired from the above 

Literature

Eduard Trier, Jean Arp. Sculptures 1957-1966, Stuttgart, 1968, no. 211, illustration of another cast pp 110 & 111
Arie Hartog & Kai Fischer, Jean Arp, Sculptures, A Critical Survey, Bonn, 2012, no. 211, illustration of the marble version p. 152

Catalogue Note

Arp's distinctive style represents the nexus of abstraction and the artist's quest for the definitive representation of the human figure, of which he stated, "I wanted to find another order, another value for man in nature" (Jane Hancock, Arp, Cambridge, 1986, p. 14). While his abstraction-minded contemporaries maintained that the search for universal value and truth necessitated the abandoning of objective realities such as the human form, Arp sought to combine both convictions.

The concise and seamless Torse-fruit is a far cry from the efforts of early Modernists such as Auguste Rodin, and while still reading clearly as a torso, the work possesses an entirely new language of form. The shape is complete, recognizable and fluid. Appendages are reduced to protruding bud-like nodes and the soft curves and gliding contractions suffice to suggest the human body. Arp became entranced with the concept of the node. The poet Friederich Holderlin, who Arp revered, stated, "The node has always been the language of the gods" (quoted in Eduard Trier, Marguerite Arp-Hagenbach & François Arp, Jean Arp, Sculpture, His Last Ten Years, Stuttgart, 1968, p. 12). Stefanie Poley writes, "Rather than equating human beings with shells, stones, and plants, Arp was developing means to express their access to holiness. Nature was thereby elevated to cosmos, a new interpretation or at least one Arp had not formulated in this way before" (Stefanie Poley, The Human Figure in the Later Work, Minneapolis, 1987, p. 228). As such, Torse-fruit is representative of the artist's capacity for transcendental mysticism and his appropriation of multiple, sometimes heterogeneous, artistic modes. 

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York