308
308
Pablo Picasso
GRAND VASE AUX DANSEURS
Estimate
500,000700,000
LOT SOLD. 687,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
308
Pablo Picasso
GRAND VASE AUX DANSEURS
Estimate
500,000700,000
LOT SOLD. 687,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Pablo Picasso
1881 - 1973
GRAND VASE AUX DANSEURS
Dated 24 juin 50; numbered 18 and stamped Madoura Plein Feu and Empreinte originale de Picasso (on the interior)
Incised and painted terracotta
Height: 28 1/8 in.
71.3 cm
Executed in June 1950 in a numbered edition of 25.
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Provenance

Private Collection, Belgium (and sold: Sotheby's, London, March 20, 1996, lot 126)
Acquired at the above sale

Literature

Alain Ramié, Picasso, Catalogue de l'oeuvre céramique édité 1947-1971, Vallauris, 1988, no. 114, illustration of another example p. 63

Catalogue Note

Picasso’s foray into ceramics was deeply influenced by the tactile experience of working directly with his medium. He experimented with paint effects, glazes, carving and etching, exploring the diverse possibilities that the medium provided. With its combination of fleshy flowing pink-hued terracotta figures against stark white paint, Grand vase aux danseurs demonstrates the commanding and innovative way in which Picasso’s new-found creativity manifested in this ancient practice. The precision of the carved forms demonstrates a painterly agility and easy manipulation which are unique to Picasso’s work. Ceramics from Vallauris in the early 1950s are among Picasso’s most desirable, distilling the artist at his most experimental and historically engaged.

Due in part to its abundant supply of distinctive pinkish-red clay, ceramic production in Vallauris dates back to the Roman Empire, when the area was a hub of amphorae production. The undulating form and contrasting colors of Grand vase aux danseurs are reminiscent of the vases of antiquity, mirroring Picasso’s fascination with archaeology at that time. The work’s two instrument players, dancing woman, and hand-standing man that flow across the curved surface of the vessel allude to Greco-Roman mythological creatures. The artist was not only influenced by ancient motifs, but also by the region’s longstanding tradition of pottery. The feeling of freedom working in the Madoura studio and living in the historical roots of the surrounding area continually inspired to inspire Picasso’s late work.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York