156
156

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED ASIAN COLLECTION

Alfred Sisley
LE BARRAGE DE LA MACHINE À MARLY
Estimate
350,000450,000
JUMP TO LOT
156

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED ASIAN COLLECTION

Alfred Sisley
LE BARRAGE DE LA MACHINE À MARLY
Estimate
350,000450,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Alfred Sisley
1839 - 1899
LE BARRAGE DE LA MACHINE À MARLY
Signed Sisley and dated 73 (lower left)
Oil on canvas
15 by 24 1/8 in.
38 by 61.4 cm
Painted in 1873.
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This work will be included in the new edition of the Catalogue Raisonné of Alfred Sisley by François Daulte now being prepared by Galerie Brame & Lorenceau for the Comité Alfred Sisley.

Provenance

Mme G. Morris, Paris (acquired from the artist)
Jules Allard et Fils, Paris
Meyer Goodfriend, New York (and sold: American Art Association, New York, January 4 & 5, 1923, lot 79)
Carl Kaufman, New York
Schoeneman Galleries, New York
Private Collection, New York (and sold: Parke-Bernet Galleries, Inc., New York, January 25, 1956, lot 91)
Stephen Hahn Galleries, New York (acquired at the above sale)
Private Collection, Caracas
Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Sair, Winnipeg, Manitoba (and sold: Parke-Bernet Galleries, Inc., December 9, 1959, lot 67)
French Art Galleries (acquired at the above sale)
Gallery Sakai, Tokyo
Acquired from the above

Literature

François Daulte, Alfred Sisley, Catalogue raisonné de l'oeuvre peint, Lausanne, 1959, no. 70, illustrated n.p.

Catalogue Note

Painted at the height of Sisley’s career in 1873, Le Barrage de la machine à Marly is emblematic of the artist’s tranquil, reflective landscapes. A short walk from Sisley’s 1870s home in the Paris suburb of Louveciennes, the machine de Marly was part of a grand hydraulic system built at the request of King Louis XIV to deliver water from the Seine to the Palace of Versailles. Although the machine had been out of commission since the late eighteenth century, tourists and artists alike continued to flock to the sight into the nineteenth century. “Thomas Girtin was among them, and drew both the aqueduct and the Machine in 1803. Later, Turner made a water color [sic] of the machine with a fashionable crowd of people on the bank of the Seine. In early works by Renoir, Monet, and Pissarro, the aqueduct straddles the distant hills” (Richard Shone, Sisley, New York, 1992, p. 81).

Sisley painted the aqueducts and the machine several times in the 1870s, but in these works, he highlighted the architecture of the structures (see fig. 1). In the present work, however, Sisley focuses on the surrounding landscape, paying great attention to the light and colors of the riverbank and leaving the spectacle of the machine nestled behind vegetation in the background.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York