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Bachmann, John
PANORAMA OF THE SEAT OF WAR. BIRDS EYE VIEW OF TEXAS AND PART OF MEXICO. NEW YORK: JOHN BACHMANN, PUBLISHER, 1861 
Estimate
18,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 16,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT
3
Bachmann, John
PANORAMA OF THE SEAT OF WAR. BIRDS EYE VIEW OF TEXAS AND PART OF MEXICO. NEW YORK: JOHN BACHMANN, PUBLISHER, 1861 
Estimate
18,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 16,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Printed and Manuscript Americana, Including Cartography

|
New York

Bachmann, John
PANORAMA OF THE SEAT OF WAR. BIRDS EYE VIEW OF TEXAS AND PART OF MEXICO. NEW YORK: JOHN BACHMANN, PUBLISHER, 1861 
Chromolithographed map (32 5/8 x 23 3/4 in.; 831 x 580 mm), drawn and lithographed by Bachmann.

Handsomely framed with UVIII Plexiglass. Some light browning at margin edges and very light browning at central fold.


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Literature

Rumsey 3713; Rumsey, Cartographica Extraordinaire, pp. 62–63, 141; Stephenson 446.8

Catalogue Note

This is the rarest and most desirable sheet from Bachmann's six-sheet birds-eye view of the Confederate States in 1861, depicting the coast of Texas from Littel (sic) Constance Bay, Louisiana, to the Rio Grande; this Texas sheet continues the full view west from the Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Part of Florida sheet. "The Birds Eye View of Texas and Part of Mexico is a fascinating view of the state at mid-century, clearly identifying all of the major Texas cities, rivers, roads, and ports. There are a few mistakes—he seems to locate "Austin City" on the Guadalupe rather than the Colorado—but the view provides the kind of glimpse of the coastline that might have been useful in military planning" (Ron Tyler). Bachmann even seems to indicate the presence of Union blockade vessels in the Gulf of Mexico. 

"The most natural way to portray the shape of a surface is an oblique perspective, or bird’s eye view. Despite its name, the bird’s eye view is drawn from an artificial, even impossible vantage point. From no one place on earth, or off of it, could one see the land stretching away—to the horizon. … Unlike a standard, orthographically-oriented map, which is equally artificial but makes no pretense to be anything else, an oblique view such as this emphasizes the shape of the land surface over portraying what is on that surface. In the early days of the American Civil War, Bachmann chose a unique vantage point … to create his panoramic view of the likely theaters of war. … Produced in three-color lithography, Bachmann’s views were issued as separate maps" (Rumsey, Cartographica Extraordinaire).

Fine Printed and Manuscript Americana, Including Cartography

|
New York