234
234
Lucie Rie
FOOTED BOWL
Estimate
35,00045,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
234
Lucie Rie
FOOTED BOWL
Estimate
35,00045,000
LOT SOLD. 50,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Design

|
New York

Lucie Rie
FOOTED BOWL
with artist's cypher
porcelain, pink inlay glaze, manganese rim
4 1/8  in. (10.5 cm) high
8 3/8  in. (21.3 cm) diameter
circa 1980
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Provenance

Queensberry Hunt Design, London, circa 1980s

Literature

Tony Birks, Lucie Rie, Yeovil, Somerset, 1987, pp. 185 and 212 (for related examples)
Oliver Watson, British Studio Pottery, Oxford, 1990, p. 107 (for a related example)
Emmanuel Coper, Lucie Rie: Modernist Potter, New Haven, 2012, no. 98 (for a related example)

Catalogue Note

Lucie Rie thought of herself as a “man-made” potter. Trained at the Kunstgewerbeschule (School of Art and Design) in Vienna in the 1920s, Rie gained international recognition at the 1925 Paris International Exhibition where she exhibited an earthenware piece that was inspired by Asian aesthetics.  Just before World War II, she fled Austria and settled in London where she established her own studio and began collaborating with her mentee and longtime friend Hans Coper, another leading figure of British studio pottery. 

Throughout her career, Rie revealed little about her artistic techniques as onlookers marveled at the unparalleled beauty and complexity of her ceramics.  “I work in a completely unorthodox manner, no longer using any form of scientific method,” Rie explained, “I glaze my pots raw, often using a number of glazes on top of each other and sometimes between one glaze and the next layer of slip.”  Using an electric, oxidizing kiln to fire her pieces, she created rich, nuanced glazes and in a wide range of colors.  Particularly towards the end of 1970s, Rie experimented with bright pinks, blues, and yellows, creating exquisite low footed bowls incorporating a dripping bronze glaze at the rim and incised lines, as seen in the present lot.  The old-fashioned kiln that she used to fire these later pieces testify to the potter’s prodigious mastery over the chemical aspect of firing complex pots and creating vivid colors. 

Important Design

|
New York