166
166

PROPERTY FROM THE TALMOR COLLECTION

Archibald Knox
A UNIQUE "TUDRIC" CLOCK, MODEL NO. 095
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 43,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
166

PROPERTY FROM THE TALMOR COLLECTION

Archibald Knox
A UNIQUE "TUDRIC" CLOCK, MODEL NO. 095
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 43,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Design

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New York

Archibald Knox
A UNIQUE "TUDRIC" CLOCK, MODEL NO. 095
impressed TUDRIC
polished pewter, abalone
7 1/2  x 4 1/4  x 1 3/4  in. (19 x 10.8 x 4.4 cm)
circa 1902-1905
produced by Liberty & Co., London
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Morgan Strickland Decorative Arts, London
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Literature

see following lot for literature relating to a larger version of this model

This example will be published in Dr. Stephen Martin's forthcoming publication on Archibald Knox and is the only known example in this size.

Catalogue Note

Exceedingly rare, this deceptively simple rectangular clock is one of Knox’s most modern designs.  By constructing the front with a three-part design consisting of a narrow panel flanked by two wider ones, Knox balances the vertical thrust of the body with design elements that draw the eye outward.  In so doing he achieves a resting monumentality with precise rectilinear areas that is characteristic of the essence of modernism.  In this clock can be seen echoes of other great modernist clock designs such as the standing clock designed for the Willow Tea Rooms by C. R. Mackintosh and in early clock designs by Josef Hoffmann and his colleagues at the Wiener Werkstätte; all employed the square, the rectangle and the vertical to achieve their modernist effects.  In comparison to those examples that have more sharply conceived dials, by chasing the numerals on the lustrous metal itself, Knox lends a human softness to this singular work of abstraction.  It is a historically significant aesthetic bridge between Knox and other great early modernist designers.  Offered alongside the large version, this unique variation loses nothing of its aesthetic power though it is half the size of its sibling.

DR. STEPHAN A. MARTIN

Important Design

|
New York