148
148
Greene & Greene
PAIR OF ANDIRONS FROM THE LAURABELLE ARMS ROBINSON HOUSE, PASADENA, CALIFORNIA
Estimate
30,00050,000
JUMP TO LOT
148
Greene & Greene
PAIR OF ANDIRONS FROM THE LAURABELLE ARMS ROBINSON HOUSE, PASADENA, CALIFORNIA
Estimate
30,00050,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Design

|
New York

Greene & Greene
PAIR OF ANDIRONS FROM THE LAURABELLE ARMS ROBINSON HOUSE, PASADENA, CALIFORNIA
patinated bronze, iron
11 x 12 1/4  x 8 1/4  in. (27.9 x 31.1 x 21 cm) each
1906
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Laurabelle Arms Robinson House, Pasadena, California, 1906 
David Rago Auctions, Lambertville, New Jersey, 26 September 1999, lot 644 
Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton
Freeman's, Philadelphia, April 29, 2018, lot 183
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Literature

Randell L. Makinson, Greene & Greene: Furniture and Related Designs, Salt Lake City, 1979, p. 42 (for the present lot illustrated)
Edward R. Bosley, Greene & Greene, London, 2000, p. 84 (for a sketch of the design)

Catalogue Note

In their design for the Pasadena residence of Henry M. and Laurabelle A. Robinson, Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene drew on diverse aesthetics for inspiration.  Laurabelle, the heiress to a Midwest iron fortune, actively participated in the project while her husband travelled for business, approving design plans but still giving full creative license to Greene & Greene to design the house and all of its furnishings.  The complex architecture shows the influence of the Spanish mission style, British Arts & Crafts movement, and Germanic, Japanese, and Native American aesthetics, and was executed on a stately, impressive scale that contrasted Greene & Greene’s popular bungalow structures.  The furniture reflects many of the same influences with slightly greater emphasis on Asian themes.  The present andirons designed for the living room fireplace are austere yet dynamic, balancing positive and negative space to create a harmonious composition.  The half-tsuba shapes that decorate the sides and top of each andiron are an abstract reference to Japanese sword-guards, which Charles collected, and are a form that the architects utilized elsewhere in the Robinson house and in many of their most iconic works.  The present andirons are visible in a period photograph of the Robinson house in the collection of the Environmental Design Archives at the University of California at Berkeley.

Important Design

|
New York