3697
3697

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

A RARE FINELY CAST GILT-BRONZE FIGURE OF A LUOHAN
QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD
Estimate
500,000700,000
JUMP TO LOT
3697

PROPERTY FROM A EUROPEAN PRIVATE COLLECTION

A RARE FINELY CAST GILT-BRONZE FIGURE OF A LUOHAN
QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD
Estimate
500,000700,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

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Hong Kong

A RARE FINELY CAST GILT-BRONZE FIGURE OF A LUOHAN
QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD
cast seated on a low splayed rectangular patterned cushion, the figure of the luohan, possibly Kanakabharadhvaja or Chudapanthaka, rendered seated with the head gently lowered and turned to the right, the hands folded in meditation on the legs, depicted clad in loose robes cascading in voluminous folds and draping over the front edge of the cushion with hems finely detailed with floral motifs, the face, hands and neck decorated in matte gold paint with highlights of red pigment to the lips
18.8 cm, 7 1/2  in.
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Provenance

A Missouri private collection.

Exhibited

Footsteps of the Buddha: Masterworks from Across the Buddhist World, Sotheby’s, New York, 2013, cat. no. 16.

Catalogue Note

This finely cast and gilded figure, in which the facial expression is depicted with exceptional naturalism, represents one of the Sixteen Luohan, considered to be the Elders of Buddhism and students of the historical Buddha Shakyamuni. The bronze is likely to depict either Kanakabharadhvaja or Chudapanthaka, both figures often shown seated in the diamond posture with hands folded in meditation.

The luohan is from the same group as a particularly fine and expressive Qianlong series of luohan, of which four are now in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, gifted by Natasha Rambova, 1963-155-7, 1963-155-8, 1963-155-9, 1963-155-10, and four sold in our New York rooms, 21st September, 2007, lots 48 and 49, also previously in the Rambova collection. See also other luohan from the series sold in our New York rooms, 24th March, 2011, lots 74 and 75 (previously sold 22nd September 2000, lot 23, sometime collection of Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt II).

A series depicting the luohan would often comprise twenty-five bronzes altogether in keeping with post-16th century Sino-Tibetan tradition, with the Sixteen Great Luohan together with Dharmatala and Hvashang, Buddha Shakyamuni and his principal disciples Maudgalyayana and Shariputra, and the Four Guardians of the Directions, Vaishravana, Virupaksha, Virudhaka and Dhritarashtra.

The sculpture is distinguished by exquisite quality, poise and freedom of expression in common with the Rambova and Vanderbilt sculptures, with related cushion design and idiosyncratic rendering of the robes with deep folds and a loose collar. Typical of bronzes from the Qianlong period, the face and hands are not fire-gilded but painted with matte gold to create a naturalistic effect in contrast with the burnished mercury gilding of the robes and throne cushions.

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong