3613
3613

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

A DOUCAI 'PEONY AND ROCK' DISH
MARK AND PERIOD OF YONGZHENG
Estimate
1,000,0001,500,000
JUMP TO LOT
3613

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

A DOUCAI 'PEONY AND ROCK' DISH
MARK AND PERIOD OF YONGZHENG
Estimate
1,000,0001,500,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong

A DOUCAI 'PEONY AND ROCK' DISH
MARK AND PERIOD OF YONGZHENG
the interior finely painted with two butterflies fluttering amidst three colourful tree peony blooms, one bloom in yellow, another lavender and the third iron red, all springing from the same tree growing from the base of a large garden rock, the rounded sides of the exterior painted with a chrysanthemum on one side and hibiscus and pinks on the other, both similarly flourishing from rocks with butterflies on each side, the base inscribed in underglaze blue with a six-character reign mark within a double circle
21 cm, 8 1/4  in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

A Japanese private collection.
Sotheby's Hong Kong, 11th April 2008, lot 2970.

Catalogue Note

The design is striking for its combination of highly stylised rockwork, skilfully painted in washes of underglaze blue in the manner of ink painting, and the flowers executed in the bright doucai palette of glossy overglaze enamels.

A closely related dish, from the Woodthorpe and Aykroyd collections, is included in the Oriental Ceramic Society exhibition Enamelled Polychrome Porcelain of the Manchu Dynasty, London, 1951, cat. no. 99, and later sold in our London rooms, 6th April 1954, lot 105 and again, 17th May 1966, lot 229. Two other related examples to the present pair were sold in our Hong Kong rooms, 26th October 1993, lot 154, and 25th April 2004, lot 444; and another dish, from the collection of Dr and Mme Ho-Ching Yang, was sold in our New York rooms, 17th March 2009, lot 10.

Dishes of this type can also be found painted entirely in underglaze blue; for example see a pair of dishes included in the exhibition Ming and Ch'ing Porcelain from the Collection of the T.Y. Chao Family Foundation, Hong Kong Museum of Art, Hong Kong, 1978, cat. no. 86; and another single dish illustrated in Soame Jenyns, Later Chinese Porcelain, London, 1951, pl. LXI.

The design of butterflies and peonies has traditionally been a favoured motif in China for its highly auspicious qualities, with the peony symbolising wealth and honour, and the butterflies (hudie) representing the wish for 'accumulation of blessings' (fudie).

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong