262
262

PROPERTY FROM GALLISON HALL, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA: THE JAMES F. SCOTT COLLECTION

las Casas, Bartolomé de
'THE TEARS OF THE INDIANS: BEING AN HISTORICAL AND TRUE ACCOUNT OF THE CRUEL MASSACRE AND SLAUGHTERS OF ABOVE TWENTY MILLIONS OF INNOCENT PEOPLE, TRANS. JOHN PHILLIPS'. LONDON: PRINTED BY J.C. FOR NATH. BROOK, 1656 
Estimate
1,5002,500
LOT SOLD. 1,625 USD
JUMP TO LOT
262

PROPERTY FROM GALLISON HALL, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA: THE JAMES F. SCOTT COLLECTION

las Casas, Bartolomé de
'THE TEARS OF THE INDIANS: BEING AN HISTORICAL AND TRUE ACCOUNT OF THE CRUEL MASSACRE AND SLAUGHTERS OF ABOVE TWENTY MILLIONS OF INNOCENT PEOPLE, TRANS. JOHN PHILLIPS'. LONDON: PRINTED BY J.C. FOR NATH. BROOK, 1656 
Estimate
1,5002,500
LOT SOLD. 1,625 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Books and Manuscripts Including Americana Online

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las Casas, Bartolomé de
'THE TEARS OF THE INDIANS: BEING AN HISTORICAL AND TRUE ACCOUNT OF THE CRUEL MASSACRE AND SLAUGHTERS OF ABOVE TWENTY MILLIONS OF INNOCENT PEOPLE, TRANS. JOHN PHILLIPS'. LONDON: PRINTED BY J.C. FOR NATH. BROOK, 1656 
8vo (6 3/8 x 4 in.; 163 x 102mm). Woodcut initials and headpieces; title neatly repaired and remargined, folding engraved plate in facsimile, a few leaves with minor marginal repairs, blanks A1, B8, and K4 lacking, minor foxing. Full brown calf, bound by Worsfold, covers with multiple gilt rules, spine with raised bands in six compartments, second and third with green and red morocco lettering pieces, others with repeat overall gilt filigree motif, all edges marbled, inner dentelles gilt, marbled endpapers; joint a bit rubbed. 
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Provenance

E. Daniel Liberman — Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, February 23, 1966, lot 26
— Sotheby's New York, June 3, 1997, lot 9

Literature

Church 549; Sabin 11289; Thomason, E.1586[1]; Wing C799

Catalogue Note

First edition. An English translation of 'Brevisima relacion de la destruccion de las Indias' (1552), a work described by Church as the "most gruesome" of its age. It contains graphic accounts of the cruelty of the Spaniards towards the Indians. Bartolomé de las Casas was the most fervent and influential advocate of Indian rights during his time. He lived during a period in which Spanish conquistadors viewed the Indians as natural slaves and barbarians. This translation is by John Phillips (1631-1706), a nephew of John Milton, and in his preface Phillips denounces the Spanish in language that recalls his uncle's fallen angels: "the Indians... received (the Spanish) as Angels sent from Heaven, till their excessive cruelties, the torments and slaughters of their countrymen mov'd them to take Arms against the Spaniards." The book is dedicated to "Oliver, Lord Protector of the Commonwealth," who is encouraged to punish "the bloody and popish nation of the Spaniards." Milton was Cromwell's official censor and it appears probable that this populist and gory translation by his nephew is intrinsically an extension of Milton's remit to promote the dissemination of pro-Protector propaganda.

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