844
844

PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR

Very Fine and Rare Queen Anne Figured Walnut Block Front Chest of Drawers , Boston, Massachusetts, Circa 1760
Estimate
80,000120,000
JUMP TO LOT
844

PROPERTY OF A PRIVATE COLLECTOR

Very Fine and Rare Queen Anne Figured Walnut Block Front Chest of Drawers , Boston, Massachusetts, Circa 1760
Estimate
80,000120,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana

|
New York

Very Fine and Rare Queen Anne Figured Walnut Block Front Chest of Drawers , Boston, Massachusetts, Circa 1760
appears to retain its original cast brass hardware, retains a dark, rich historical surface.
Height 30 1/2 in. by Width 35 1/2 in. by Depth 20 in.; Width of case 33 in.
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Provenance

Collection of Israel Sack Inc., 1938;
Collection of Charles K. Davis.

Literature

Albert Sack, The New Fine Points of Furniture (New York, 1993): 107;
Israel Sack Inc., American Antiques from Israel Sack Collection, Volume V, P4350, p. 1324.

Catalogue Note

Retaining its original bat wing brasses and escutcheons, this chest is distinguished by high quality craftsmanship, use of vibrantly figured walnut, and refined proportions. It was formerly in the seminal Americana collections of Israel Sack in 1938 and Charles K. Davis. It is illustrated as “superior” in The New Fine Points of Furniture by Albert Sack (New York, 1993, p. 107).

Referred to as a “swelled” front in the eighteenth century, the blocked façade was a distinct regional preference in New England, particularly in the cabinetmaking centers of Colonial Boston and Newport. With its squared façade, four drawers, and straight bracket feet, this chest is an accomplished example of the form as interpreted in the Boston area. The flat-face blocking with rounded ends is typical of block front furniture from Boston. The conforming, overhanging case top, base blocked at the ogival molding and continuing to the front brackets with ogival outlines integrates the design.

A similar blockfront chest with a history in the Cushing family of Newburyport, Massachusetts is illustrated in American Antiques from Israel Sack Collection, Volume II, no. 1121, p. 449.  Another in the collection of Winterthur Museum descended through five generations of the Selfridge family of Rhode Island.1

1 See Nancy E. Richards and Nancy Goyne Evans, New England Furniture at Winterthur, 1997, no, 176, pp. 357-8.

Important Americana

|
New York