794
794

PROPERTY FROM THE DUDLEY & CONSTANCE GODFREY FOUNDATION

The Fisher-Wharton-Smith Family Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Mahogany Camel-Back Serpentine-Front Sofa, Philadelphia, Circa 1780
Estimate
15,00030,000
JUMP TO LOT
794

PROPERTY FROM THE DUDLEY & CONSTANCE GODFREY FOUNDATION

The Fisher-Wharton-Smith Family Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Mahogany Camel-Back Serpentine-Front Sofa, Philadelphia, Circa 1780
Estimate
15,00030,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana

|
New York

The Fisher-Wharton-Smith Family Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Mahogany Camel-Back Serpentine-Front Sofa, Philadelphia, Circa 1780
retains original under-upholstery on back; stretchers repaired.
Height 37 1/2 in. by Width 89 5/8 in. by Width 26 1/2 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Samuel Rowland Fisher (1745-1834), Philadelphia;
Deborah Fisher Wharton (1795-1889), Philadelphia;
Esther Fisher Wharton (1836-1915), Philadelphia;
Esther Morton Smith (1865-1942), Newport, Rhode Island;
Property from a direct descendant of the original owner;
Christie's, New York, Important American Furniture, Folk Art and Decorative Arts, October 23, 1993, sale 7752, lot 223

Catalogue Note

This sofa was brought from Philadelphia by Esther Morton Smith when she moved to Newport, Rhode Island, in the late 19th/ early 20th century. The provenance of this sofa is related to another Philadelphia camel-back sofa at the Department of State, which was purchased from a direct descendant of Charles Wharton and Samuel Rowland Fisher (See Clement E. Conger and Alexandra W. Rollins, Treasures of State: Fine and Decorative Arts in the Diplomatic Reception Rooms of the U.S. Department of State, (New York: H.N. Abrams, 1991), pp. 154-5, fig. 69).

The preservation of the original under-upholstery and webbing on the back of this sofa makes it a rare survival and an important document to period upholstery techniques. This sofa is one of the few remaining examples from Philadelphia which retain their under-upholstery and stuffing; the other is the Wharton and Fisher sofa at the Department of State, which retains both its original under-upholstery as well as its yellow moreen covering on the back.

Important Americana

|
New York