787
787

PROPERTY FROM THE DUDLEY & CONSTANCE GODFREY FOUNDATION

The Richard Hart Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Pierced Cross-Stretchered Pembroke Table, Possibly by Robert Harrold (w. 1765-1792), Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Circa 1775
Estimate
6,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
787

PROPERTY FROM THE DUDLEY & CONSTANCE GODFREY FOUNDATION

The Richard Hart Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Pierced Cross-Stretchered Pembroke Table, Possibly by Robert Harrold (w. 1765-1792), Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Circa 1775
Estimate
6,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana

|
New York

The Richard Hart Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Pierced Cross-Stretchered Pembroke Table, Possibly by Robert Harrold (w. 1765-1792), Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Circa 1775
branded R HAR to the proper front left support, appears to retain its original cast brass hardware; retains a rich historic surface.
Height 26 3/4 in. by Width open 38 1/4 in. by Depth 30 3/4 in.: Width closed 19 1/4 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Richard Hart (1733-1820), Portsmouth, New Hampshire;
Walton noted that he aquired the table as either from the Johnson family of Marblehead, Massachusetts or the Gerrish Family of Kittery, Maine;
John S. Walton, Riverside, Connecticut. 

Literature

John Walton advertisement, Magazine Antiques 54:5 (December 1948), 407.

Catalogue Note

As noted by Diane Carlberg Ehrenpreis, this table's design resembles English examples and was likely crafted by an English-trained cabinetmaker, such as Robert Harrold  (see Portsmouth Furniture: Masterworks from the New Hampshire Seacoast, ed. Brock Jobe, (Boston, MA: Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities; Hanover, NH: Distributed by University Press of New England, 1993), pp. 246-7, pl. 12).

The brand present on the fly denotes that this table was originally owned by Richard Hart (1733-1820), a Portsmouth merchant, who was married to Mercy Collins and lived on Russell Street. He owned a wharf in the North End of Portsmouth and a store on Fore Street.  The inventory of his home notes the presence of two pembroke tables.

Important Americana

|
New York