412
412
American silver large "Peacock Feather" pitcher, Martelé, Gorham Mfg. Co., Providence, RI, 1897
Estimate
25,00035,000
JUMP TO LOT
412
American silver large "Peacock Feather" pitcher, Martelé, Gorham Mfg. Co., Providence, RI, 1897
Estimate
25,00035,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana

|
New York

American silver large "Peacock Feather" pitcher, Martelé, Gorham Mfg. Co., Providence, RI, 1897
the neck chased with peacock feathers above a band of stylized feathers, the everted handle also modeled as a feather, gilt interior, the base engraved Thayer in script foliate lettering
marked on base and coded 8623
height 17 3/4 in.
45 cm
126 oz
3919 g
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Literature

Larry Pristo, Martelé: Gorham's Nouveau Art Silver, 2002, p. 240.

Catalogue Note

According to Gorham's records, this piece is listed as a claret, but also called a pitcher. This is apparently one of two of this form with this number. This one was completed on November 9, 1897 with a weight of 126.5 oz. It took 96 hours to make, 75 hours to chase, and its net factory price was $320. 

This piece was made in 1897, the first full year of Martelé production, and the completion date suggests that it was finished to be part of the initial public viewing of the Martelé line, at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York on November 15, 1897.  Larry Pristo writes that this "collection of about 300 pieces" would have included essentially every piece of Martelé made to this point, approximately 311 items excluding flatware (op. cit., p. 18).

The Thayer name is probably for John Borland Thayer II (1862-1912), Director and Second Vice President of the Pennsylvania Railroad.  He married in 1892 Marian Morris, and the couple lived on an estate, "Redwood", in Haverford, PA.  In 1912 they and their son were returning from Europe as first-class passengers on the Titanic; John Thayer was lost in the disaster, Mrs. Thayer and her maid survived, and Jack Thayer jumped from the sinking ship and was rescued clinging to an overturned lifeboat.

Important Americana

|
New York