1169

Details & Cataloguing

Important Americana

|
New York

Pair Of French Empire Gilt-Bronze Mounted Mahogany Fauteuils By Louis-Alexandre Bellangé, circa 1820
each stamped L BELLANGÉ under the front seat rail; one stamped CH to the rear seat rail.
Height 36 1/2 in. by Width 23 1/2 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Sotheby's, New York, Important French and Continental Furniture, November 5, 1998, sale 7201, lot 485;
Christie's, Paris, Important Mobilier et Objets d'Art, June 21, 2006, sale 5417, Lot 350
Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc., New York.

Catalogue Note

Louis-Alexandre Bellangé (1796-1861) belonged to one of the most important dynasties of cabinetmakers working in Paris in the first half of the 19th century, along with his father Pierre-Antoine Bellangé (1757-1827), his uncle Louis-François Bellangé (1759-1827), and his cousin Alexandre Bellangé (1799-1863).  The family were official suppliers to the Napoleonic court and subsequently the royal households of the Bourbons and King Louis-Philippe, and also executed major commissions for leading private and overseas clients including the celebrated suite of giltwood seat furniture ordered by President James Monroe for the White House in 1817.  Although this set was removed and sold by the US government in 1860, part of the group found its way back to the White House in the 20th century and is now on view in the Blue Room.

The present pair was probably made in c.1820, when Louis-Alexandre had just become an associate in his father's workshop, of which he would later assume control in 1827.  The form and style are typical of the classic Empire period of ten years earlier, though the gilt-bronze mounts add a greater element of richness as they replicate ornamental motifs that would normally be executed as applied carved reliefs in wood.  These chairs are part of a larger suite comprising a sofa and six armchairs, the sofa of which is illustrated in Sylvain Cordier, Bellangé, ébénistes.  Une histoire du goût au XIXe siècle, Paris 2012, p.504.  The CH stamp has thus far not been identified.

Important Americana

|
New York