3459
3459
A JADE FIGURE OF A HORSE
SONG – YUAN DYNASTY
Estimate
500,000700,000
JUMP TO LOT
3459
A JADE FIGURE OF A HORSE
SONG – YUAN DYNASTY
Estimate
500,000700,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Gems of Chinese Art – The Speelman Collection II

|
Hong Kong

A JADE FIGURE OF A HORSE
SONG – YUAN DYNASTY
depicted recumbent with its legs neatly tucked beneath its body, the head rendered with a meticulously combed mane and turned backwards, the body subtly defined with taut muscles and a pronounced spine terminating in a finely incised tail curled along the length of its left haunch, the stone of a pale greyish-celadon colour extensively accentuated with dark inclusions
7.7 cm, 3 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Catalogue Note

A sense of subtle movement is captured through the incorporation of the natural russet inclusions of the stone, which have been skilfully used to render the fur of the animal and create an attractive contrast to the luminous yellow stone.

While horses have long been associated with power and wealth in China, as those most sought after were imported or sent as tribute gifts from Central Asia, jade carvings of horses in reclining poses first appeared in the Jin (1115-1234) and Yuan dynasties (1279-1368), such as one in the British Museum, London, illustrated in Jessica Rawson, Chinese Jade from the Neolithic to the Qing, London, 1995, pl. 26:15, where the author notes that these carvings have been traditionally attributed to the Tang dynasty (618-907) despite the lack of similar excavated examples.

For representations of horses in different poses in contemporaneous paintings and wood block illustrations, which are known from the Yuan dynasty, see for example the painting Eight Horses on Pasture Enjoying their Freedom by Zhao Mengfu (1254-1322), published Osvald Sirén, Chinese Painting. Leading Masters and Principles, vol. 6, London, 1958, pl. 15.

Gems of Chinese Art – The Speelman Collection II

|
Hong Kong