3450
3450
A RARE DARK BROWN LACQUER BARBED CHARGER
MING DYNASTY, 15TH CENTURY
Estimate
1,200,0001,800,000
JUMP TO LOT
3450
A RARE DARK BROWN LACQUER BARBED CHARGER
MING DYNASTY, 15TH CENTURY
Estimate
1,200,0001,800,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Gems of Chinese Art – The Speelman Collection II

|
Hong Kong

A RARE DARK BROWN LACQUER BARBED CHARGER
MING DYNASTY, 15TH CENTURY
of generous proportions with broad rounded sides divided into eight bracket foliations, all supported on a short straight foot reinforced with three short feet, the interior of the charger centred with a recessed circular panel, the lacquer patinated to a rich dark brown colour
46 cm, 18 1/8  in.
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Catalogue Note

The designs of Ming lacquerware owe a large part to the styles first developed in the Song and Yuan dynasties. This present undecorated dish exudes an elegant simplicity that is complemented by the warm tone of the lacquer and its fine, natural crackles. Known as yise or guangsu for its clean, simple look, monochrome lacquer was often the favoured choice of imperial lacquerware. According to Xiushi lu [A Treatise on Lacquer Art], the Ming manual for lacquer manufacture by Huang Cheng, the main colours applied on monochrome lacquer are red, black, yellow, green and purple, among which red, black and purple are the most common, and can consequently be seen on the largest variety of wares.

First introduced in the Yuan dynasty, the distinctive ‘water caltrop’ shape can often be seen on blue and white wares produced during the Yuan, as well as the Yongle and Xuande periods in the Ming dynasty. Thriving trade across Eurasia along maritime and overland routes from the Yuan to the early Ming dynasties suggests the ‘water caltrop’ form to have drawn its inspiration from Central Asian metalwork and pottery, some of which were produced for the Muslim market. The seven westward maritime expeditions led by the eunuch Zheng He for the Yongle Emperor not only facilitated the export of Chinese ceramics and silks, but brought back on his returns treasures and curiosities from regions associated with the exotic, records of which offer a glimpse into the fascinating history of global exchange in the period.

Other examples of this rare bracket lobed form include a dish dated to the Yuan dynasty in the collection of the Museum Fur Ostasiatische Kunst Der Stadt Koln, illustrated in Meisterwerk aus China, Korea und Japan, Museen der Stadt Koln, 1979, p. 50, no. 48; and another of similar form in the collection of the Tokyo National Museum, illustrated in Hai-wai Yi-chen, Chinese Art in Overseas Collections: Lacquerware, 1987, no. 42. Compare also a smaller dish sold at Christie's Hong Kong, 30th April 2001, lot 627.

Gems of Chinese Art – The Speelman Collection II

|
Hong Kong