3444
3444
A RARE AND EXCEPTIONAL BAMBOO VENEER 'LOTUS' BRUSHPOT
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Estimate
800,0001,000,000
JUMP TO LOT
3444
A RARE AND EXCEPTIONAL BAMBOO VENEER 'LOTUS' BRUSHPOT
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Estimate
800,0001,000,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Gems of Chinese Art – The Speelman Collection II

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Hong Kong

A RARE AND EXCEPTIONAL BAMBOO VENEER 'LOTUS' BRUSHPOT
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
of quatrefoil section, each curved facet carved in shallow relief with a shaped rectangular panel enclosing birds amidst a lotus pond, the rippled waters interrupted by curved stippled stems of broad leaves with furled edges, lotus flowers and pods, the rim and foot encircled by bands of keyfret, the surface of the bamboo veneer well patinated to a deep caramel tone
w. 18.5 cm, 7 1/4  in.
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Catalogue Note

Intricately rendered in the zhuhuang or bamboo veneer technique and deftly decorated with idyllic scenes of nature in shallow relief, the present brushpot is an exceptionally fine object destined for the scholar’s desk created with sophistication and utmost attention to detail.

The making of this brushpot involved the application of several thin panels, taken from the inner wall of the bamboo stem, over a wood core. These panels are then bound and held in place by the thick everted mouth and foot. The smoothly executed curving contours and proportionate symmetry of the vessel’s quatrefoil shape demonstrate the deft finish of the current brushpot.

Furthermore, meticulous attention has been paid to the decoration on this piece, seen in the well-planned composition of various panels depicting a lotus pond scene. The shallow-relief decoration, though seemingly monotonous at first sight, is cleverly incorporated with varying portrayals of water birds amongst. The carver’s dexterity and mastermind are also evidenced in the flowing lines and naturalistic rendering of the broad veined leaves and blooming lotus flowers in various orientations.

This brushpot bears testament to the mature development of bamboo carving at the height of the Qing dynasty. Objects of this type and executed to such sophistication are extremely rare, see a dated example of double lozenge shape depicting figural scenes from the Romance of the Three Kingdoms, exhibited in Objects for the Scholar’s Desk, Maria Kiang Chinese Art, Hong Kong, 2012, no. 7.

Gems of Chinese Art – The Speelman Collection II

|
Hong Kong