3441
3441
A CLOISONNE ENAMEL AND GILT-BRONZE ‘DUCK’ INCENSE BURNER AND COVER
MING DYNASTY, 16TH CENTURY 
Estimate
800,0001,000,000
JUMP TO LOT
3441
A CLOISONNE ENAMEL AND GILT-BRONZE ‘DUCK’ INCENSE BURNER AND COVER
MING DYNASTY, 16TH CENTURY 
Estimate
800,0001,000,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Gems of Chinese Art – The Speelman Collection II

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Hong Kong

A CLOISONNE ENAMEL AND GILT-BRONZE ‘DUCK’ INCENSE BURNER AND COVER
MING DYNASTY, 16TH CENTURY 
well cast in the form of a duck standing on its right webbed foot with the left raised, atop an associated 16th century gilt-bronze stepped beaded-edged pedestal with a pendent lotus border, the bird depicted with its gilt-bronze head slightly turned to the left with its beak rendered agape and revealing its slender tongue, inlaid with beaded yellow eyes in paste, the exterior of the hollow body, neck and upturned tail brightly enamelled with undulating streaks of plumage, the cover forming the back of the bird and similarly rendered with bright plumage, centred with a pierced circular aperture in the form of a cash coin
24 cm, 9 3/8  in.
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Provenance

The Oriental Art Gallery Ltd, London, 1995.
Collection of David B. Peck III.
Christie's New York, 18th September 2014, lot 604.

Exhibited

Oriental Works of Art, The Oriental Art Gallery Ltd, London, 1995, cat. no. 116.

Catalogue Note

It is rare to find a Ming dynasty Imperial cloisonné enamel incense burner of this high quality, created in the form of a mandarin duck. Another closely related example from the Qing Court collection, depicted standing on a stylised lotus leaf, preserved in the Palace Museum, Beijing, is illustrated in The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum. Metal-bodied Enamel Ware, Hong Kong, 2002, pl. 76. The overall structure, modelling technique and precise treatment of the enamelled design and specific details including the poised webbed feet, closely relate to the current example. Compare also the cloisonné enamel ‘mandarin duck’ incense burner sold in these rooms, 3rd April 2018, lot 3448, from the Speelman collection.

For another Ming dynasty bird-form incense burner, see a cloisonné enamel example in the form of a waterfowl in the National Palace Museum, Taipei, illustrated in Enamel Ware in the Ming and Ch'ing Dynasties, Taipei, 1999, pl. 42.  See also a goose-form incense burner, lacking its pedestal, from the collection of David David-Weill and now in Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, is illustrated in Beatrice Quette, ed., Cloisonné. Chinese Enamels from the Yuan, Ming, and Qing Dynasties, New York, 2011, p. 277, cat. no. 104. 

Gems of Chinese Art – The Speelman Collection II

|
Hong Kong