771
771
A tortoiseshell, ivory and silver casket in Japanese taste, J. & R. Fleming Ltd., London, 1919
JUMP TO LOT
771
A tortoiseshell, ivory and silver casket in Japanese taste, J. & R. Fleming Ltd., London, 1919
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

From Earth to Fire

|
London

A tortoiseshell, ivory and silver casket in Japanese taste, J. & R. Fleming Ltd., London, 1919
oval, the lid imitating a three-dimensional pond applied with a dragonfly, its front legs reaching towards an ivory and silver-gilt water lily next to a surfacing frog between chased silver water lily leaves and other insects, further inset with silver stars, silver hinges and thumbpiece, crimson velvet-lined interior, fully marked
21.6cm., 8 1/2 in. wide
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

J. S. M. Scott Collection

Catalogue Note

The construction of this tortoiseshell casket, with its characteristic hinges and mounts, is typical of such items made during the 1920s. Illustrated in advertisements in The Bystander, The Sketch and other fashionable magazines, these boxes were often fitted with manicure sets for sale by retailers such as The Goldsmiths' & Silversmiths' Co. Ltd. of Regent Street. The unusual decoration of the lid of the present casket, with insects and a dragonfly – the latter's wings celebrated for their iridescence in the Art Nouveau period - can be understood in the context of the early 20th century revival of Japonisme. This extensive interest in Japanese art was also reflected in furniture during the mid 1920s: red and black lacquered desks, gramophone cabinets and other exotically decorated items available from the best shops. At this period Japanese art also inspired the design of objects of vertu, including smoking accessories and vanity cases, made by jewellers like Cartier, using lacquer, mother of pearl, ivory, carved corals and jade. One of the key figures in this 20th century revival of both Japonisme and the Aesthetic Movement was the furniture designer and architect, Eileen Gray (1878 –1976). Later a pioneer of the Modern Movement, she had opened a lacquer workshop in Paris in 1910, where fine quality lacquer furniture and objets d'art were made on commission for wealthy clients whose sensibilities inclined towards the refinement of Japanese taste.

From Earth to Fire

|
London