252
252
Gladstone, William Ewart
A GROUP OF 3 AUTOGRAPH LETTERS, AND 1 POST CARD, SIGNED, BY THE EMINENT BRITISH STATESMAN 
Estimate
2,0003,000
JUMP TO LOT
252
Gladstone, William Ewart
A GROUP OF 3 AUTOGRAPH LETTERS, AND 1 POST CARD, SIGNED, BY THE EMINENT BRITISH STATESMAN 
Estimate
2,0003,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Fine Autograph Letters and Manuscripts from a Distinguished Private Collection: Part II | Music, Americana, English and Continental Literature

|
New York

Gladstone, William Ewart
A GROUP OF 3 AUTOGRAPH LETTERS, AND 1 POST CARD, SIGNED, BY THE EMINENT BRITISH STATESMAN 
4 autograph letters signed ("W E Gladstone") 1 in English and 3 in Italian, 8 pp., paper various sizes (from 5 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.; 140 x 89 mm, to 9 x 7 1/8 in.; 228 x 181 mm), Hawarden, 21 November 1855, 16 St. James Street, 27 February 1888, and 34 Viale Principe, 3 February 1888; minor toning, foxing to postcard, earliest letter with adhesive where presumably tipped into volume and small hole just affecting two or three letters.  
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Catalogue Note

William Ewart Gladstone, the eminent British statesman of the Liberal Party, served as served Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for 12 years (spread over four terms beginning in 1868 and ending in 1894), and also as Chancellor of the Exchequer four times.

The earliest of the letters is addressed to a J. Hamilton, esq., suggesting the recipient read a article on Vienna and diplomacy in the upcoming issue of Saturday Review. "It is very ably written and the section of the history, sad and even scandalous enough, is I feel not far from the truth." Gladstone is likely referring to the Vienna Conference of 1855, which involved a good deal of hypocrisy on both sides—neither Britain nor France thought the summit would solve anything, but each wanted to use it as a means to bring Austrian into the Crimean War on their side.

The latter Italian correspondence is to a Signor Dotti, regarding the shipment of books Britain.  "I received the crate addressed to London: books in good condition," Gladstone begins. "But the 1477 Dante that I bought from you cannot be found. It may be my error, and this book was packed in the other (bigger) crate at Howarden? Please let me know the reason for the mistake, and please send the Dante as soon as possible."

The earliest of the letters was written while Gladstone was serving as a Member of Parliament for Oxford University, and the latest whilst serving as a Member of Parliament
for Midlothian. 

Fine Autograph Letters and Manuscripts from a Distinguished Private Collection: Part II | Music, Americana, English and Continental Literature

|
New York