151
151

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF MICHAEL ASHER AND BETTY ASHER, SOLD TO BENEFIT THE MICHAEL ASHER FOUNDATION

Ed Ruscha
STAINS (ENGBERG B9)
Estimate
30,00040,000
LOT SOLD. 81,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT
151

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTIONS OF MICHAEL ASHER AND BETTY ASHER, SOLD TO BENEFIT THE MICHAEL ASHER FOUNDATION

Ed Ruscha
STAINS (ENGBERG B9)
Estimate
30,00040,000
LOT SOLD. 81,250 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Contemporary Art Day Auction

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Ed Ruscha
B. 1937
STAINS (ENGBERG B9)
signed and numbered 21 on the justification; each sheet numbered 1-75 consecutively 
The complete portfolio, comprising 76 stains, loose (as issued), on wove paper, apart from one which is printed on the silk lining, with the title page and list of plates, contained in the original stamped leather portfolio
each sheet: 12 by 10 3/4 in. 30.5 by 27.3 cm.
case: 12 1/2 by 11 1/2 by 1 1/2 in. 31.8 by 29.2 by 3.8 cm.
Executed in 1969, this work is number 21 from an edition of 70, plus 2 artist's proofs.
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Provenance

Collection of Betty Asher, Beverly Hills
Collection of Michael Asher, Los Angeles (by descent from the above in 1994)
By descent from the above to the Michael Asher Foundation in 2013

Literature

Clive Philpott and Siri Engberg, Edward Ruscha: Editions 1959-1999: A Catalogue Raisonné Vol. 1, Minneapolis 1999, cat. no. B9, pp. 98-99, illustrated in color
Clive Philpott and Siri Engberg, Edward Ruscha: Editions 1959-1999: A Catalogue Raisonné Vol. 2, Minneapolis 1999, cat. no. B9, p. 125

Catalogue Note

"What is a stain? In normal parlance regarding fabric, the word always denotes soilage, dirtiness, a mess...However, art jargon observes a special meaning of stain, coined by the Clement Greenberg to name the procedure, presumably derived from Jackson Pollock by Helen Frankenthaler, that put within reach the formalist ideals for painting of utter 'flatness' and 'pure opticality.' Making his Stains in the early 1970s, a period that saw among other things the decadence of color field, Ruscha economically revived the Pollockian marriage of beauty and squalor. This may help to explain why, with such apparent modesty, the Stains pack such a punch. They are filthy beautiful in classic key." 

Peter Schjeldahl in Exh. Cat., New York, Robert Miller Gallery, Edward Ruscha Stains 1971 to 1975, 1992, n.p.

Contemporary Art Day Auction

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New York