422
422
A George III copper-lacquered-brass mounted mahogany cylinder bureau, circa 1770-1780
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422
A George III copper-lacquered-brass mounted mahogany cylinder bureau, circa 1770-1780
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

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A George III copper-lacquered-brass mounted mahogany cylinder bureau, circa 1770-1780
the roll-top opening to reveal three compartments above three short and three dummy drawers with a gilt-tooled green leather inset extending writing surface, above an arrangement of four leather fronted drawers, one enclosing a coffre-fort, three locks stamped E. Gascoigne
104cm. high, 106cm. wide, 60.5cm. deep; 3ft. 5in., 3ft. 5¾in., 1ft. 11¾in.
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Catalogue Note

This unusual bureau à cylindre, with its leather fronted drawers and copper-lacquered-brass mounts, is conceived in the Louis XVI style popularised by ébénistes such as David Roentgen (1743-1807) and Jean-Henri Riesener (1734-1806).

Distinctly English in its construction, three locks are stamped E. Gascoigne. Elizabeth Gascoigne, a specialist metalsmith working in London from the mid-18th century, produced locks, mechanism and other hardware for furniture made by the leading cabinet-makers of the day, including Thomas Chippendale (1718-1779), William Vile (c. 1700-1767) and Mayhew and Ince (fl. 1759-1803). Examples of her work can be found on a mahogany commode supplied by Thomas Chippendale to Sir Rowland Winn, 5th Bt. (1739-85) in circa 1767 incorporates Gascoigne locks (see Christie’s London, Thomas Chippendale, 300 Years, 5 July 2018, lot 10), as well as a jewel-cabinet supplied to Queen Charlotte in 1762 by William Vile and several locks and hinges supplied to Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire by Mayhew & Ince between 1776-1787[1]. 

[1] Wood, L., Catalogue of Commodes, Liverpool, 1994, p. 184.

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