378
378

PROPERTY OF A EUROPEAN LADY

The return of Orestes and Iphigenia to Aulis', A mythological tapestry from The Story of Orestes, Northern Netherlands, workshop of Pieter de Cracht, Gouda or Schoonhaven, after designs by Salomon de Braij  circa 1648-1662
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378

PROPERTY OF A EUROPEAN LADY

The return of Orestes and Iphigenia to Aulis', A mythological tapestry from The Story of Orestes, Northern Netherlands, workshop of Pieter de Cracht, Gouda or Schoonhaven, after designs by Salomon de Braij  circa 1648-1662
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Details & Cataloguing

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The return of Orestes and Iphigenia to Aulis', A mythological tapestry from The Story of Orestes, Northern Netherlands, workshop of Pieter de Cracht, Gouda or Schoonhaven, after designs by Salomon de Braij  circa 1648-1662
woven depicting the triumphal arrival of Iphigenia, Orestes and Pylades and welcome from the inhabitants of Aulis, with the statue of the goddess Artemis being carried aloft in the procession, and the masts of ships in the background; reduced in width and height, lacking border

 


approximately 245cm. high, 346cm. wide; 8ft., 11ft. 4in.
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Catalogue Note

De Cracht, originally from Oudenaarde had workshops in Gouda and Schoonhoven, and not only traded weavings of the series but also had them woven in his own workshop. He worked with the designer Salomon de Braij (1597-1664), and the painters that worked in the Oranjezaal. Of the number of Iphigenia sets known, commissioned for the German and Swedish nobility there is a set of five in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, including a weaving of the present subject, (Inv.BK-19550-100-E). The series are woven within a distinctive Solomonic columned architectural border type, originally designed by Peter Paul Rubens in his Apotheosis of the Eucharist (1625-1628), and which was interpreted with variations by the Dutch weavers, and which is lacking on the present weaving.

For comprehensive discussion of the Greek and Roman series woven in the Northern Netherlands, including the series of The Story of Iphigenia and Orestes’ (Story of Atrides), and the influence of Karel van Mander II, see Ebeltje Hartkamp-Jonxis and Hillie Smith, European Tapestries in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, 2004, pp.175-180, & 62a-e, pp.241-250.

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