348
348

PROPERTY FROM THE JOHN MURRAY COLLECTION

Joseph Knibb. A walnut month-going longcase clock, London, circa 1675 and later, movement and case associated
JUMP TO LOT
348

PROPERTY FROM THE JOHN MURRAY COLLECTION

Joseph Knibb. A walnut month-going longcase clock, London, circa 1675 and later, movement and case associated
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

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Joseph Knibb. A walnut month-going longcase clock, London, circa 1675 and later, movement and case associated
10½-inch dial the corners finely engraved with tulips and foliage, signed along the lower edge Joseph Knibb Londini fecit, finely matted centre with subsidiary seconds dial and date aperture, the movement with six knopped and ringed pillars, anchor escapement with bolt and shutter maintaining power, five wheel trains, external locking plate striking on a bell, the pendulum with wing nut regulation to the top of the suspension spring and attached by a hook below the crutch, further wing nut to the pendulum rod, the associated case with flat top moulded cornice and spiral pilasters to the rising hood with spoon locking, rectangular trunk door with glazed lenticle, crossbanded plinth, the whole case substantially re-built
194cm. 6ft. 4½in. high
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Provenance

John Murray, friend and trading partner of Percy Webster and thence by descent to the current owner.

Catalogue Note

Joseph Knibb, the most famous and inventive member of the celebrated Knibb clockmaking family was born circa 1640; he was apprenticed to his cousin Samuel in about 1655 and after serving seven years worked first at Oxford and then moved to London in 1670 where he was made Free of the Clockmakers’ Company. He must soon have built up a good reputation for himself as it is recorded that he supplied a turret clock for Windsor Castle in 1677 and payments were made to him in 1682 on behalf of King Charles II.

Towards the end of the 17th century Joseph Knibb moved to Hanslop in Buckinghamshire. A few clocks with the Hanslop address are known but by the early years of the 18th century Knibb had virtually retired; he died in December 1711.

 

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London