972
972
THE ASHE-DAVIS FAMILY VERY FINE AND RARE WILLIAM AND MARY TURNED AND JOINED WALNUT WAINSCOT SIDE CHAIR, POSSIBLY JOHN BECHTEL (1690-1777), SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA, PROBABLY GERMANTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA, CIRCA 1740
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 18,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
972
THE ASHE-DAVIS FAMILY VERY FINE AND RARE WILLIAM AND MARY TURNED AND JOINED WALNUT WAINSCOT SIDE CHAIR, POSSIBLY JOHN BECHTEL (1690-1777), SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA, PROBABLY GERMANTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA, CIRCA 1740
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 18,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

|
New York

THE ASHE-DAVIS FAMILY VERY FINE AND RARE WILLIAM AND MARY TURNED AND JOINED WALNUT WAINSCOT SIDE CHAIR, POSSIBLY JOHN BECHTEL (1690-1777), SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA, PROBABLY GERMANTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA, CIRCA 1740
appears to retain its original surface.
Height 43 5/8 in.; 110.7 cm.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Descended in the Ashe and Davis families, Germantown, Pennsylvania;
Twaddell family, Pennsylvania;
Joe Kindig, Jr. & Son, York, Pennsylvania;
Ginsburg & Levy, New York, October 1971;
Vogel Collection no. 144.

Exhibited

Historical Society of York County, York, Pennsylvania, The Philadelphia Chair: 1685-1785, May-September 1978;
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Worldly Goods: The Arts of Early Pennsylvania, 1680- 1758, October 10, 1999-January 10,  2000.

Literature

Joseph K. Kindig, III, The Philadelphia Chair: 1685-1785, (York, PA: The Historical Society of York County, 1978), no. 7;
Benno M. Forman, American Seating Furniture, 1630-1730, (New York: W.W. Norton, 1988), pp. 174 (referenced);
Jack Lindsey, Worldly Goods: The Arts of Early Pennsylvania, 1680-1758, (Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1999), p. 168, no. 125.

Catalogue Note

One of only two known examples, both having ownership associations with Germantown.  This chair which descended in the Ashe and Davis families of Germantown, Pennsylvania is, as Benon Forman stated, “a valuable document of eastern Pennsylvania culture of its time.” Reason being that it represents the creolization of Anglo and Germanic craft traditions in material culture design.  Forman states that it “stands in contrast to the numerous examples of furniture made in Pennsylvania by craftsmen from southern Germany who arrived in the colony later … and made furniture that is stylistically indistinguishable from what they made in their homeland.” The other identical example is in the collection of Winterthur Museum (acc. no. 66.698) (see Benno M. Forman, American Seating Furniture, 1630-1730, (New York: W.W. Norton, 1988), pp. 172-4, no. 31). Beatrice B. Garvan and Charles F. Hummel suggested that a possible turner for the chair could have been John Bechtel (1690-1777) in The Pennsylvania Germans: A Celebration of their Arts, 1683-1850, (Philadelphia: Philadelphia Museum of Art, 1982), p. 60, pl. 17.

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

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New York