827
827
AN EXTREMELY RARE AND IMPORTANT CAST-BRASS AND ‘SURREY ENAMEL’ TRUMPET-BASE CANDLESTICK, ATTRIBUTED TO ANTHONY HATCH AND STEPHEN PILCHERD, LONDON, ENGLAND, CIRCA 1650
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 37,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
827
AN EXTREMELY RARE AND IMPORTANT CAST-BRASS AND ‘SURREY ENAMEL’ TRUMPET-BASE CANDLESTICK, ATTRIBUTED TO ANTHONY HATCH AND STEPHEN PILCHERD, LONDON, ENGLAND, CIRCA 1650
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 37,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

|
New York

AN EXTREMELY RARE AND IMPORTANT CAST-BRASS AND ‘SURREY ENAMEL’ TRUMPET-BASE CANDLESTICK, ATTRIBUTED TO ANTHONY HATCH AND STEPHEN PILCHERD, LONDON, ENGLAND, CIRCA 1650
comprised of four sections.
Height 9 in. by Diameter 6 3/8 in.; 22.9 by 16.2 cm.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Private Collection, London, June 2003;
Vogel Collection no. 725.

Catalogue Note

This exceptional candlestick belongs to a small group of cast and enameled brasswares, made in the second half of the seventeenth century, which includes stirrups, mirror-frames, fire-dogs, sconces, badges, and sword-hilts. The colors used for the enameling were limited to matt black, white, blue, green, yellow and red and the cast work is usually roughly finished. A few examples have Royalist associations including badges decorated with the Royal arms.

The items in the group are distinguished by their method of production: the fields to be enameled were cast in the molds and not, as was more common; engraved (champlévé) or enclosed (cloisonné) after production. The comparatively small output of this work and the repeated use of identical models for the stems of candlesticks, firedogs, and cups suggests that these objects are the products of a single workshop.

These brasswares were for a long time referred to as 'Surrey Enamels' after the author Charles R. Beard ascribed their manufacture to a workshop in Esher, Surrey, but documentary evidence makes a strong case for their reattribution to the London workshops of Anthony Hatch and Stephen Pilcherd. Hatch, a prominent member of the Armourers' and Braziers' Company, supplied an enameled brass chimney-piece to the Company, which was placed in its Court Room. Many of the other enameled wares from this group were associated with fireplaces. Hatch is known to have worked with Pilcherd, another member of the Armourers' and Braziers' Company.

Despite their rough-and-ready appearance, such enameled brasswares usually hail from prestigious private collections, suggesting that they were expensive and the workshop that produced them had a small but comparatively wealthy clientele. A nearly identical pair is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, acc. nos. 64.101.1622 and 1623 (see Yvonne Hackenbroch, Bronzes Other Metalwork and Sculpture in the Irwin Untermyer Collection, (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1962), fig. 206, pl. 183).

For additional information see https://www.antiquemetalware.org.uk/2016/12/06/17th-century-mid-drip-enamelled-candlestick/,  Claude Blair. “Surrey Enamels Reattributed: Part 1.” Journal of the Antique Metalware Society, vol. 13, June 2005, pp. 2-9 and Claude Blair and Angus Patterson. “Surrey Enamels Reattributed: Part 2, An Illustrated List of Known Types.” Journal of the Antique Metalware Society, vol. 14, June 2006, pp. 10-21.

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

|
New York