676
676
AN ENGLISH DELFTWARE POLYCHROME EQUESTRIAN CHARGER
CIRCA 1670-80
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
676
AN ENGLISH DELFTWARE POLYCHROME EQUESTRIAN CHARGER
CIRCA 1670-80
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

|
New York

AN ENGLISH DELFTWARE POLYCHROME EQUESTRIAN CHARGER
CIRCA 1670-80
London or Bristol, painted with George Monck, first Duke of Albemarle, astride his galloping steed within a yellow line and blue dash border.
diameter 13 1/4 in.
33.5 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

A. E. Clarke Collection, sold, Sotheby's, London, June 18, 1921, lot 36a
G.F. Glenny Collection, sold, Sotheby's, London, May 29, 1956, lot 43
Jonathan Horne, London, June, 1988
Vogel Collection no. 504

Literature

Edward Andrews Downman, Blue dash chargers and other early English tin enamel circular dishes, London, 1919, facing p. 86
Jonathan Horne, A Collection of Early English Pottery, Part VIII, Cat. no. 195

Catalogue Note

General George Monck (1608-1670) was a significant figure in the restoration of Charles II. Between February and May 1660, Monck secured an agreement between Parliament and the exiled Stuart Court which resulted in Charles's landing at Dover on 25th May 1660. The King rewarded him handsomely for his efforts making him a Gentleman of the Bedchamber, Knight of the Garter, and Master of the Horse in the King's Household. On 7th July 1660 he was created Baron Monck of Potheridge, Beauchamp, and Teyes, Earl of Torrington and Duke of Albemarle. Ten years after his death, he was still a popular hero and was seen as leader of the legitimacy of the monarchy.

The identification of this figure is partly based on an inscribed dish with an elaborate kraak type border, bearing the initials 'D/G M' and 'T/16 B A 80', in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. The inscription probably also references the marriage of a Mr. Benjamin Taylor to Anne Aldridge at St Leonard's, Shoreditch, on 1 January 1680, illustrated by James Lomax, 'Baroque forms and decoration on English Pottery 1640-1760', Fire and Form – The Baroque and its influence on English Ceramics, c. 1660-1760, English Ceramic Circle, 2013, pp.171-208, together with other examples and a possible image source in the British Museum. Further dishes of this type are in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, acc. no. 62.1212; the British Museum, London, mus. no. 1887,0307, E.152 and the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, published by Michael Archer, Delftware in the Fitzwilliam Museum, London, 2013, p. 58, A.86.

See also the example illustrated by Leslie B. Grigsby, The Longridge Collection of English Slipware and Delftware, London, 2000, Vol. 2, pp. 50-51, D17, where the author identifies the figure as George Monck, the first Duke of Albemarle.

The Collection of Anne H. & Frederick Vogel III

|
New York