Lot 1109
  • 1109

LIN LIANG (CIRCA 1428-1494) | TWO GEESE IN AN AUTUMN LOTUS POND

Estimate
120,000 - 160,000 USD
Sold
200,000 USD
bidding is closed

Description

  • Lin Liang
  • TWO GEESE IN AN AUTUMN LOTUS POND
  • ink on silk, hanging scroll
  • 137.5 by 78 cm. 54 1/8  by 30 3/4  in.
signed Lin Liang, with one seal of the artist, yi shan tu shu Attached inscription by Zhuang Yan (1899-1980), dated bingwu (1966), spring, with two seals, zhuang yan, mu ling; Zhang Daqian (1899-1983), signed Daqian jushi, dated dingwei (1967), the seventh lunar month, with one seal, zhang yuan zhi yin; Jiang Zhaoshen (1925-1996), signed Jiaoyuan Jiang Zhaoshen, dated bingwu, the fifth lunar month, with two seals, jiang zhao shen yin, jiao yuanTitleslip by Lin Qingni (1914-?), signed Lin Qingni, with one seal, qing ni With six collectors' seals of the Chew family, liao dong qiu yong he cang, qiu yong he yin (2), yun meng wu zhong ying cang, wu zhong ying yin (2), qiu fu lun yin, qiu fu lun cang huawith two collector's seals of Na Zhiliang (1908-1998), na zhi lian yin, xin ru guo yan; and one collector's seal of Li Lincan (1913-1999), li lin can yin

Literature

The Carmel Pine Cone, April 1, 1971, vol. 57, no. 13, p. 5

Catalogue Note

Zhuang Yan's inscription:
Lin Yishan served the imperial court in Beijing and was skilled at painting flowers and fruit in color. He was especially adept at using ink. In the emerging and disappearing mist, the activities of the mallards and geese are clearly seen. The tree branches are strong and tensile like cursive calligraphy. Painters now cannot compare to luminaries from the past. Seeing this scroll now gives proof that what I said before is true.

Zhang Daqian's inscription:
Among Lin Liang's various extant works, many have a fierce and brutish air, which many people to belittle as "Cantonese style." This work alone is elegant and refined. It must count among his finest works.

Jiang Zhaoshen's inscription:
Hu Laigong wrote that "Lin Yishang had a reputation above Lu Ji's. Most of Ji's works bear spurious signatures of [Lin] Liang." Hu lived during the Jiajing reign of the Ming dynasty, and his opinion must have been based in reality. Compared to the Lin Liang works in the Qing imperial collection, this painting is from the identical source in brushwork and spirit. One can be sure that it is one of his authentic surviving works, worthy of being cherished.

Close