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34

PPROPERTY FROM THE FAMILY COLLECTION OF G. R. SANTOSH

Gulam Rasool Santosh
UNTITLED
Estimate
35,00,00040,00,000
JUMP TO LOT
34

PPROPERTY FROM THE FAMILY COLLECTION OF G. R. SANTOSH

Gulam Rasool Santosh
UNTITLED
Estimate
35,00,00040,00,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Boundless: India

|
Mumbai

Gulam Rasool Santosh
1929 - 1997
UNTITLED
Signed, dated and inscribed '87 / SANTOSH / GARHI STUDIOS' and further signed in Devanagari on reverse
Oil on canvas
70 x 50 in. (177.8 x 127 cm.)
Painted in 1987
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Provenance

Collection of Artist
Thence by descent to the current owner circa late 1990s

Catalogue Note

In 1964, Gulam Rasool Santosh had a mystical experience that was to have a profound effect on his work. "I went to Amarnath in the sixties, purely as an artist-tourist. But the truth is, that unknown to me, this yatra (journey/pilgrimage) changed my life, the way I think. Upon my return from the yatra, a ‘new’ poetry was born." (K. Singh, Awakening: A Retrospective of G.R. Santosh, Delhi Art Gallery, New Delhi, 2011, p. 39) After this, Santosh became fascinated by religious traditions within Kashmiri Shaivism, a branch of Indian philosophy. This came to influence his art as the awareness and consciousness that stemmed from frequent meditation and practice of Tantra took form in his paintings as transcendent imagery. Santosh launched himself at the vanguard of the neo-Tantric movement, associated with painters such as K.C.S. Paniker and Biren De. This work is an example of the artist’s signature neo-Tantrism, which centred on symbols found in Buddhist and Hindu tradition.

Here, as is typical in his work, he has implemented ancient tantric iconographies and subsequently reinterpreted them by reducing them to abstractions, culminating in the construction of a fresh aesthetic language. This vertically symmetrical picture plane consists of an anthropomorphic figure leaning within a meditative stare. Santosh has decorated the body with yantras, or sacred geometrical symbols, that signify the regenerative aspects of consciousness. The head is composed of a circular naad bindu, representing the cosmos in its equivocal state, sharing an axis with geometric tantric shapes at the abdomen. The curved contours delineate a voluptuous feminine aspect, softening the angular lines. Shakti in Hinduism represents the female principle of divine energy and power that first creates and then preserves the universe.

Boundless: India

|
Mumbai