3111
3111
A RARE HEIRLOOM JIAN RUSSET-STREAKED 'NOGIME TEMMOKU' BOWL 
SOUTHERN SONG DYNASTY
Estimate
1,000,0001,500,000
LOT SOLD. 2,500,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
3111
A RARE HEIRLOOM JIAN RUSSET-STREAKED 'NOGIME TEMMOKU' BOWL 
SOUTHERN SONG DYNASTY
Estimate
1,000,0001,500,000
LOT SOLD. 2,500,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Arcadian Beauty – Exceptional Works from the Song Dynasty

|
Hong Kong

A RARE HEIRLOOM JIAN RUSSET-STREAKED 'NOGIME TEMMOKU' BOWL 
SOUTHERN SONG DYNASTY
well potted with deep rounded sides rising from a short straight foot to a thin concave groove below the rim, unctuously covered with a lustrous black glaze with russet 'hare's fur' running from the rim and pooling along the groove, the glaze stopping neatly above the foot revealing the dark brown body, the rim bound with metal; together with a lacquer cupstand with deep rounded sides collared with a six-lobed mallow-form flange, all supported on a flared foot, covered overall save for the interior of the stand and flange in black lacquer, the interior lacquered red, Japanese wood box
12.2 cm, 4 3/4  in.
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Catalogue Note

'Hare's fur' glazed bowls of this radiant type, which have been passed from hand to hand over the centuries in Japan, are rare. The humble appearances of these tea bowls made them appropriate for use in Buddhist temples, and they were held in great esteem in the Song dynasty (960-1279). Dramatically contrasting to the white foam of whipped tea, bowls enveloped in this lustrous black glaze were greatly appreciated and soon gained popularity beyond the monastic circles. Emperor Huizong (r. 1101-1125), well known for his love for tea, stated that black-glazed tea bowls, especially those decorated with 'hare's fur' like the present example, were the most desirable. Together with whipped tea, Song dynasty 'Jian' tea bowls are believed to have arrived in Japan in the Kamakura period (1185-1333) when Zen Buddhism was introduced, and have since then been greatly treasured.

A similar bowl was included in the exhibition Karamono temmoku [Chinese temmoku], MOA Art Museum, Atami, 1994, cat. no. 6. This exhibition catalogue, where a few important heirloom temmoku tea bowls preserved in Japan were juxtaposed with a large sample of excavated specimens from the kiln site, impressively documented the wide range of qualities and the excellence of the examples collected in Japan. Another bowl with a similar glaze effect in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, was included in the exhibition Hare's Fur, Tortoiseshell, and Partridge Feathers. Chinese Brown- and Black-Glazed Ceramics, 400-1400, Harvard University Art Museums, Cambridge, Mass., 1996, cat. no. 83. Only one sherd with a similar glaze effect is illustrated in J.M. Plumer, Temmoku. A Study of the Ware of Chien, Tokyo, 1972, p. 59, pl. 8.

Arcadian Beauty – Exceptional Works from the Song Dynasty

|
Hong Kong