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53
Henry Roderick Newman
FLOWERS IN A LANDSCAPE
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 47,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
53
Henry Roderick Newman
FLOWERS IN A LANDSCAPE
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 47,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

American Art

|
New York

Henry Roderick Newman
1843 - 1917
FLOWERS IN A LANDSCAPE
signed HR NEWMAN and dated 1883 (lower right)
watercolor on paper
image: 20 by 6 1/4 inches (50.8 by 16.5 cm)
sheet: 20 by 12 5/8 inches (50.8 by 32.1 cm)
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Provenance

Private collection, by 1990
[With]Alfred J. Walker Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts
Vance Jordan Fine Art, New York, 1990 (probably acquired from the above)
Acquired by the present owner from the above

Exhibited

New York, The Jordan-Volpe Gallery, Inc., A Quiet Devotion: The Life and Work of Henry Roderick Newman, April-June 1996, no. 19, p. 109, illustrated p. 83

Catalogue Note

Executed in 1883, Flowers in a Landscape relates to a series of floral watercolors that Henry Roderick Newman painted between 1875 and 1884. According to Newman scholar Royal W. Leith, "these pictures were among Newman’s most distinctive and prized works, particularly those depicting anemones” (A Quiet Devotion: The Life and Work of Henry Roderick Newman, New York, 1996, p. 24). The strong verticality of the present watercolor, which portrays five anemones against a lush landscape, is unique in relation to the other works from the series.

The artist initially explored the genre of flower-painting during his first few years with the American Pre-Raphaelites, a group of artists who drew significant inspiration from the writings of the English art critic and theoretician John Ruskin. Though the American Pre-Raphaelites disbanded before Newman reached the age of twenty-five, he remained committed to Ruskin’s ideals throughout his career. Working primarily in watercolor, Newman typically began his flowers en plein air before finishing them in the studio. In this practice, he adhered to the theories of Ruskin, his mentor and friend, who wrote: “I believe the most beautiful position in which flowers can possible be seen is precisely their most natural one—low flowers relieved by grass or moss, and tree blossoms relieved against the sky" (as quoted in Ibid.) Showcasing delicate, refined brushwork and subtle variations in tone and color, the present work is a distinguished example of Newman’s ability to convey the transcendent quality of nature and art, a central tenet of Ruskin’s philosophy.

American Art

|
New York