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Mark Matveevich Antokolsky
RUSSIAN
LA BELLE AU BOIS DORMANT (SLEEPING BEAUTY)
JUMP TO LOT
79
Mark Matveevich Antokolsky
RUSSIAN
LA BELLE AU BOIS DORMANT (SLEEPING BEAUTY)
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

19th & 20th Century Sculpture

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London

Mark Matveevich Antokolsky
1843-1902
RUSSIAN
LA BELLE AU BOIS DORMANT (SLEEPING BEAUTY)
bronze, green, brown and golden patina
63 by 57cm., 24 7/8  by 22 1/2 in. 
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Catalogue Note

This serene bronze appears to be a unique cast of Antokolsky's Sleeping Beauty. It is a work characteristic of the sculptor's late period, when he turned away from masculine, heroic subjects towards a focus on delicate femininity. Influenced by his fin-de-siècle surroundings in Paris, Antokolsky's works take on a more mysterious and symbolist character. The present model depicts a beautiful young woman whose head, shown in profile, is resting on a pillow. The pillow is adorned with foliage and coats of arms and framed by Gothic crockets, which place the composition within an ethereal, legendary setting. The model was exhibited at the Exposition Universelle in Paris in 1900, and later featured in the exhibition Artistes de l'Académie Impériale de Petrograd at the Galerie Magellan, Paris, in 1921. A plaster version of Sleeping Beauty is preserved in the Academy of Fine Arts Museum, Saint Petersburg.

The Jewish Russian sculptor Mark Matveevich Antokolsky (1845-1902) was born in Vilnius in present day Lithuania, and attended the Academy of Fine Arts in St Petersburg in 1863. He emigrated to Paris in 1881, having previously lived for some time in Berlin. Antokolsky was best known for his historical bronze subjects, and a statue of Spinoza (1881) is still considered his chef d'oeuvre. Other historical works include Ivan the Terrible (1871) and Peter the Great (1872). Antokolsky exhibited at the Universal Exhibition of Paris in 1878 to international acclaim, receiving the gold medal, the first prize in sculpture, as well as the Légion d'Honneur.

RELATED LITERATURE
M. Glants, Where is my Home? The Art and Life of the Russian Jewish Sculptor Mark Antokolsky, 1843-1902, Plymouth, 2010, p. 300

19th & 20th Century Sculpture

|
London