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Details & Cataloguing

19th & 20th Century Sculpture

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London

Alfredo Pina
1883-1966
ITALIAN
BUST OF BEETHOVEN
signed: A. Pina
white marble, on a mottled black marble socle
bust: 58cm., 22 3/4 in. 
81cm., 31 1/4 in. overall
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Catalogue Note

Having attended the Accademia di Brera in his native Milan, Pina moved to Paris around 1906 and first exhibited at the Salon in 1912. On arrival in Paris, the young Italian immediately felt the impact of Auguste Rodin's powerful style. Pina even worked in Rodin's atelier from 1909-10. In particular, he was certainly influenced by Rodin's turmoiled Gates of Hell (1880 - circa 1900).

Pina also produced a bronze version of this bust, modelled in Montpellier during the First World War. He was by no means the first sculptor to have treated the cult of the great composer Beethoven. Guiseppe Grandi, Max Klinger and Emile-Antoine Bourdelle all produced representations of Beethoven that express his genius in terms of an intense pathos and temperament. What set Pina's bust apart was the Rodinesque play of form in the expressive attitude of the modelling, which deliberately suppresses accuracy of detail for a generalised depiction of inner emotion. Pina's bust of Wagner, while sharper in the definition of form, is treated in a similar manner and with a hallmark emphasis on the rendition of the eyes. In 1920 Pina sent his Bronze bust of Beethoven for exhibition at the Venice Biennale which may be identified as the one in the 'museum of Venice' mentioned in de Pawlowski's biography of the artist published in 1929.

RELATED LITERATURE
G. de Pawlowski, Alfredo Pina, Paris, 1929, unpaginated; A. Panzetta, Nuovo Dizionario degli Scultori Italiani dell'Ottocento e del Primo Novocento, vol. II: M-Z, Torino, 2003, p. 695

19th & 20th Century Sculpture

|
London