547
547
An Italian Renaissance carved walnut, fruitwood and oak inlaid intarsia cassone in the manner of Domenico del Tasso, Florence, circa 1500
JUMP TO LOT
547
An Italian Renaissance carved walnut, fruitwood and oak inlaid intarsia cassone in the manner of Domenico del Tasso, Florence, circa 1500
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

A Venetian Legacy – An Italian Private Collection

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London

An Italian Renaissance carved walnut, fruitwood and oak inlaid intarsia cassone in the manner of Domenico del Tasso, Florence, circa 1500
the associated central panel with view of an ideal city, on a later plinth base
92.5cm. high, 197cm. wide, 73cm. deep; 3ft.½in., 6ft. 5½in., 2ft. 4¾in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Stefano Bardini, Florence, around 1900;

Semenzato Venezia, Gli Arredi dell'Abbazia di San Gregorio, 28 November 2002, lot 365.

Literature

RELATED LITERATURE

E. Callmann, “William Blundell Spence and the Transformation of Renaissance Cassoni”, The Burlington Magazine, vol. 141, no. 1155 (June 1999), pp. 338-48;

W. M. Odom, A History of Italian Furniture, New York, 1966;

R. Ferrazza, Palazzo Davanzati e le collezioni di Elia Volpi, Florence, 1994;

A. Pedrini, Italian Furniture Interiors and Decoration of the Fifeenth and Sixteenth Century, London, 1949;

M. Tinti, Il Mobilio Fiorentino, Milan-Rome;

A. Bacchi, A. De Marchi (eds.), La galleria di Palazzo Cini, Venice, 2016, pp. 329-32;

A. Wilmering, “Domenico di Niccolò, Mattia di Nanni and the development of Sienese intarsia techniques”, The Burlington Magazine, vol. 139, no. 1131, June 1997, pp. 376-97;

A. Wilmering, “The Conservation Treatment of the Gubbio Studiolo”, The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, Spring 1996, pp. 36-56.

Catalogue Note

This extraordinary cassone well exemplifies a sought-after, highly important typology of furniture that was to be found in the most patrician palaces and villas of the Florentine gentry. Together with the credenza, which however developed later, the chest or cassone - was in fact the most important piece of furniture at the time, often commissioned to celebrate a marriage, and used to house precious textiles.

Its sarcophagus shape belies the growing interest in Roman antiquities that spread in Florence from the last decades of the 15th century, and which followed earlier architectural models, largely gilt and inset with painted boards.

The present cassone is one of the finest of a series, bearing witness to the extraordinary fortune of this design which appears to have originated within the Florentine workshop of the Del Tasso family, and is traditionally associated with the bancone by Domenico and Chimenti Del Tasso (1490-1493) for the Sala dell’Udienza of the Collegio del Cambio, Perugia (ill. in Tinti, op. cit., fig. XLII, reproduced here in fig. 1), with its distinctive s-scrolled rosaces centred by a shield flanked by finely carved wings. This motif is also found on the choir stall in the Magi Chapel at Palazzo Medici Riccardi, Florence, whilst a comparable carving can be seen in the benches of the choir of the Chiesa della Badia, Florence (fig. 2).

The intarsia panels adorning the front of the present piece, probably inserted at a later date, testify to the fashionable trend for inserting pictorial fields or intarsia within existing cassoni, (see Callmann, op. cit., p. 338).

A cassone of nearly identical design is now in the Fondazione Cini, Venice, sharing a similar carved framework inset with an architectural intarsia panel. Another identically carved cassone, albeit with an empty central panel, is in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam (ill. in Catalogus van Meubelen, Amsterdam, 1952, afb. 11, cat. no. 380, p. 280). Finally, a cassone attributed to the Del Tasso workshop sold Sotheby's Milan, Salvatore e Francesco Romano. Antiquari a Firenze, 12-15 October 2009, lot 624 (102,750 EUR).

Sotheby's would like to thank Dr Simone Chiarugi for his assistance in researching and cataloguing this lot. 

A Venetian Legacy – An Italian Private Collection

|
London