Lot 33
  • 33

Cary, George & John II and John I & William

Estimate
12,000 - 18,000 GBP
Sold
12,500 GBP
bidding is closed

Description

  • A pair of English 15-inch-diameter library globes. London: G. & J. Cary, ‘1821’ (terrestrial) and J. & W. Cary, ‘1818’ (celestial) [but both with gores apparently watermarked ‘1830’].
  • Wood
The terrestrial composed of 2 sets of 12 hand-coloured engraved gores laid from pole to equator, signed in the cartouche ‘CARY’S NEW TERRESTRIAL GLOBE, Drawn from the most recent GEOGRAPHICAL WORKS, shewing the whole of the New Discoveries with the TRACKS of the PRINCIPAL NAVIGATORS and every improvement in Geography to the present Time. […] London: Published by G. & J. Cary, St. James’s Street St. Jany. 7th. 1821’, the equatorial and ecliptic graduated in degrees, the equatorial also graduated in hours and the ecliptic with symbols of the houses of the zodiac, the Greenwich meridian shown and graduated in degrees, the tropics and polar circles marked, ‘TABLE OF EQUATION shewing the difference of Time between the Clock and the Sun and The Declination of the Sun for every Day in the Year’ in the Pacific.

The celestial composed of 2 sets of 12 hand-coloured engraved gores laid from ecliptic pole to equator, signed in the cartouche ‘CARY’S NEW CELESTIAL GLOBE, ON WHICH are carefully laid down the whole of the STARS AND NEBULAE contained in the Catalogues of Wollaston, Herschel, Bode, Piazzi, Zach &c. calculated to the Year 1820. Made & Sold by J. & W. Cary No. 181 Strand London 1818’, the equatorial and ecliptic, and the solstitial and equinoctial colures graduated in degrees, the equatorial further graduated in hours and the ecliptic with symbols of the houses of the zodiac, the tropics and polar circles marked, the constellations depicted by mythical beasts and figures, scientific instruments, etc., and identified by their Latin names, the stars shown to eight orders of magnitude, with the nebulae and double-stars.



Both globes with brass hour rings graduated I-XII twice and mounted in brass meridian rings graduated in degrees and with grooves on back for locking screws (the terrestrial mounted at the poles, the celestial mounted at the celestial poles), small abrasions, minor damages, and old restorations, mounted on mahogany stands, the horizon rings with hand-coloured engraved paper rings graduated in degrees and hours, showing the points of the compass, the months, the names and symbols of the houses of the zodiac, and the constellations, some marking, cracks, surface wear, and small losses, horizon ring on terrestrial replaced in skilful facsimile, the horizon rings supported on four fluted quadrants, with quarter-circle brackets, the quadrants on central columns with brass supports and thumbscrews to lock the meridian rings, the columns supported by three downswept legs with applied turned bosses at top and bottom, one lacking from terrestrial and one from celestial, joined by three stretchers radiating from a glazed wooden compass box with engraved paper wind-rose and blued steel needle, legs terminated with brass casters, stand of celestial sun-faded, minor damage to stretchers.

Catalogue Note

A pair of library globes produced by the distinguished Cary firm, which comprised the cartographer John I (1755-1835) and his instrument-maker brother William (c. 1760-1825), and started producing globes in the late eighteenth century, trading from 181 Strand from c. 1792 until 1820, when the firm moved to 86 St James’s Street. The celestial globe is signed by John I and William, while the terrestrial is signed by John I’s sons John II and George, who took over the firm in c. 1821. Due to changing tastes, Cary celestial globes of this period were made both with and without pictorial representations of the constellations; in this example they are represented pictorially.
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