855
855

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF DR. PETER M. GREINER

SIX BRONZE MIRRORS
HAN - MING DYNASTY
Estimate
4,0006,000
JUMP TO LOT
855

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF DR. PETER M. GREINER

SIX BRONZE MIRRORS
HAN - MING DYNASTY
Estimate
4,0006,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Saturday at Sotheby's: Asian Art

|
New York

SIX BRONZE MIRRORS
HAN - MING DYNASTY
comprising two Han dynasty mirrors each with concentric bands of sunburst, rope pattern, and an inscription; a Tang dynasty mirror with three sets of confronted beasts; a Tang dynasty 'lions and grapevine' mirror; a Tang dynasty mirror with four animals encircling the knop and an inscribed outer band; and a large Ming dynasty mirror with four roundels of figures riding mythical beasts interspersed with the phrase fu shou shuang quan (may you have blessings and longevity)  (6)
Diameter of largest 9 7/8  in., 25.1 cm
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Provenance

The two Han dynasty inscribed mirrors:
Sotheby's London, 30th July 1974, lot 8 (inventory nos B15 and B 16).

The two Tang dynasty mirrors (without inscriptions):
Sotheby Parke Bernet, 25th September 1975, lot 121 (inventory nos B20 and B21).

Tang dynasty mirror acquired between 1970-1979, (inventory no. B10).

Catalogue Note

The inscriptions on the Han dynasty mirrors are portions of a common phrase that appears on mirrors of this type. The full inscription would read: Nei qing yi zhao ming, guang xiang fu ri yue, [xin ren yang er yuan zhong, ran yong sai er] bu xie 内清以昭明, 光象夫日月, [心忍杨而愿忠,然雍塞而] 不泄 (Its inner purity is shown in perfect illumination / Its light is the image of the sun and the moon / [My heart experiences uplift and is keen to be loyal / Yet it is obstructed and] unable to express it.) (See Ju-hsi Chou, Circles of Reflection: The Carter Collection of Chinese Bronze Mirrors, Cleveland, 2000, p. 56.)

The inscribed Tang dynasty mirror reads: Shang de Qin wang jing, pan bu xi qian jin. Fei guan yu zhaodan, te shi zi ming xin 赏得秦王镜、判不惜千金。非关欲照胆、特是自 明心 (I received a gift: the mirror of the King of Qin / For this, I would have paid willingly a thousand taels of silver / In no way would I use it to unveil you gall / Verily, I only wish to lay bare my own heart.) (See Xuan Wang, "Mirror of the Mind and Mirror of the World," MA Thesis, University of Georgia, Athens, 2011, p. 34.)

Saturday at Sotheby's: Asian Art

|
New York