Lot 3501
  • 3501

A 'HUANGHUALI' TEAPOT CONTAINER LATE MING DYNASTY

Estimate
80,000 - 120,000 HKD
Sold
237,500 HKD
bidding is closed

Description

  • huanghuali
of trapezoidal form, constructed with flaring straight sides with exposed dove-tailed joints to the edges rising from four bracket feet, the front carved with a central ruyi-shaped cartouche enclosing a low-relief coiling dragon typically found on the splats of extant Ming horseshoe armchairs, below an angular groove reinforced with shaped metal mounts at the rim for the teapot spout, all above a cusped lower edge between the feet, the sides of the container further decorated with metal floral roundels and a pair of wing-like fittings to house the lobed removable handle securing the flat cover, the fittings and handle decorated with cloud-shaped motifs

Exhibited

The Dr S. Y. Yip Collection of Classic Chinese Furniture, The Macao Museum of Art, Macau, 2003.
Grace Wu Bruce, Feast by a wine table reclining on a couch: The Dr S. Y. Yip Collection of Classic Chinese Furniture III, Art Museum, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 2007, pp. 178-179.

Catalogue Note

There are many surviving examples of teapot holders, mainly from the late Qing and Republic period. Almost all are made of miscellaneous soft woods, some lacquered. Those made in precious huanghuali and dated to the Ming are very rare.
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