49
49

THE PROPERTY OF PATRICK MANSEL LEWIS, STRADEY CASTLE, LLANELLY

Sir Edwin Henry Landseer, R.A.
A DEERHOUND WITH TWO DEAD ROE DEER 
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 100,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
49

THE PROPERTY OF PATRICK MANSEL LEWIS, STRADEY CASTLE, LLANELLY

Sir Edwin Henry Landseer, R.A.
A DEERHOUND WITH TWO DEAD ROE DEER 
Estimate
40,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 100,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Masters Evening Sale

|
London

Sir Edwin Henry Landseer, R.A.
LONDON 1802 - 1873
A DEERHOUND WITH TWO DEAD ROE DEER 
inscribed in chalk, verso: Lewis / 108 / May 8/74
oil on millboard
48.2 x 60.3 cm.; 19 x 23 3/4  in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

The artist's studio sale, London, Christie's, 8 May 1874 (first day of sale), lot 108 (Deerhound, Dead Stag and Fawn), for £367.10s. to Agnew's on behalf of

Charles William Mansel Lewis (1845–1931), Stradey Castle, Llanelly, Carmarthenshire;

Thence by descent.

Exhibited

Possibly London, British Institution, 1826 (as Deerhound and Dead Game).

Literature

A. Graves, The Works of the late Sir Edwin Landseer, R.A., London 1875, p. 11.

Catalogue Note

This beautiful, unfinished sketch forms part of a body of work from the late 1820s and early 1830s relating specifically to stalking and highland life. Consisting mostly of pictures of dead stags, in contrast to his later series of paintings focusing on the theme of the 'Heroic Stag', these works are the product of the artist's deep love of the sport, and his affinity with Highland life. Also included in this group are the dramatic Deer and Deerhounds in a Mountain Torrent (Tate Britain, London), exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1833, and the large scale Highlanders Returning from Deerstalking (Northumberland Collection, Alnwick Castle) of 1827.

Though many of these paintings are sporting groups which include portraits of Landseer's aristocratic friends and patrons, not all of them are, and the present study, like the latter, is one of a range of pictures which promoted the image and ethos of the Highlands for its own sake. In a variation on the them, as opposed to red stags, here the dead game are a pair of roe deer, a buck and a doe, their bodies entwined in death, the bucks head hanging limp over a rock. The composition emphasises the pathos of the quarry; a characteristic trait in Landseer's dark romantic vision of Highland sport. The sketch relates closely to several other depictions of dead roe deer, including Ptarmigan and Roebuck (Art Institute of Chicago) and Young Roebuck and Rough Hounds (Victoria and Albert Museum, London).

The focus of the picture, however, is the beautifully characterised deerhound, faithfully watching over his master’s quarry, which is painted with an innate sympathy and handled with a magnificent virtuosity that delineates every hair of its rough coat. Landseer’s dog paintings of the 1830s constitute one of the high points of his art and the image of the dog that Landseer portrayed have parallels in contemporary literature; particularly the work of Sir Walter Scott and Charles Dickens, in whose novels dogs feature largely as creatures of feeling and intelligence. Both Landseer and Scott owned deerhounds themselves and the breed were a particular favourite of the artist, both for their working abilities and their association with the chivalric world of the past.

Old Masters Evening Sale

|
London