127
127
Pieter Holsteyn the Younger (Haarlem circa 1614 - 1673) and possibly Jan van der Heyden (Gorinchem 1637 - 1712 Amsterdam)
THE PULPIT IN THE NIEUWE KERK, AMSTERDAM
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 27,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
127
Pieter Holsteyn the Younger (Haarlem circa 1614 - 1673) and possibly Jan van der Heyden (Gorinchem 1637 - 1712 Amsterdam)
THE PULPIT IN THE NIEUWE KERK, AMSTERDAM
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 27,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Old Master & British Works on Paper

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Pieter Holsteyn the Younger (Haarlem circa 1614 - 1673) and possibly Jan van der Heyden (Gorinchem 1637 - 1712 Amsterdam)
THE PULPIT IN THE NIEUWE KERK, AMSTERDAM
Pen and black ink and grey wash, over counterproofed etched outline;
bears inscription, in black chalk, verso: Preedikstoel in de Nieuwe kerk te Amsterdam
399 by 285 mm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Probably in the possession of the van Bleysweyck family at the beginning of the eighteenth century;
by inheritance in 1734 to Baron Hendrick van Slingelandt (1702-1759);
thence by descent to the present owners

Catalogue Note

This fascinating sheet records the magnificent pulpit that is the central focus of Amsterdam's Nieuwe Kerk, designed by Albert Jansz. Vinckenbrinck, and built between 1649 and 1664.  The architectural painter Jan van der Heyden seems to have made a lost drawing of this extraordinary structure, which served as the basis for a print engraved by Pieter Holsteyn II.1  The work offered here is a lightly printed counterproof of that print, which has been extensively worked up in pen and ink and grey wash.  The Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, has another such counterproof, though not worked up in the same way.2  There is no way to be sure who actually did this working up, but the quality of the handling is high, and the style as seen in the figures is not so dissimilar to that of Van der Heyden, so it is tempting to conclude that this was some kind of working proof, made with the collaboration and involvement of Van der Heyden himself. 

As is usually the case in Dutch protestant churches, the pulpit is the preeminent structure within the building, and never more so than here in the Nieuwe Kerk.  Surmounting the staggeringly elaborate tower-like structure are six angels, one of which is holding the Ten Commandments, while two are playing musical instruments (a horn and a harp).  Also included are representations of the four Evangelists, and it has been said that the image is Saint Luke is actually a self-portrait of Vinckenbrinck.

1. F.W.H. Hollstein, Dutch and Flemish Etchings, Engravings and Woodcuts, Amsterdam 1949 - present, vol. 9, p. 79, no. 31 reproduced

2. Inv. no. RP-P-1937-1584.

Old Master & British Works on Paper

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