235

Details & Cataloguing

Musical Manuscripts

|
London

Puccini, Giacomo
GOOD AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED (“GPUCCINI”), TO HIS GREAT CONFIDANTE SYBIL SELIGMAN, ABOUT THE REHEARSALS FOR MADAMA BUTTERFLY IN PARIS
giving a vivid account of his frustrations dealing with his leading soprano Marguerite Carré, the wife of the impresario at the Théàtre-Comique; he is tempted to "give her a piece of his mind and chuck it all in", but for fear that Butterfly would not be staged, describing her unappealing characteristics, especially the grand airs she gives herself, which he pretends not to notice, and her unconvincing stage mannerisms, which she considers "typically Parisienne"; Puccini also reports that the premiere will apparently be delayed until the end of the month, lamenting that he cannot leave Paris to see Sybil, since the production might fall apart at any moment, and about some ailment dogging his time there, reporting correspondence with Paolo Tosti, M. Marès and Maurice Vaucaire, with whom he is going to see a new motor car ("...un voiturette--questo mi consola [...] e mi distrae…"), and sending the best wishes of his wife Elvira  

...Cara la mia Sybil passo brutte e tristi giornate...Ma quella Mme Carré che odiosa creatura! Che arie! Mi viene la volontà di dirgliene quattro e piantare tutto. Ma non avendo pazienza come l’ho, tutto andrebbe a monte, e Butt[erfly] non si darebbe più. Allora sopporto e faccio finta di non rilevare i suoi scatti nascosti e non respirare le sue arie. Come artista non è gran cosa ma spero che finirà a riuscir bene. Certo non è vibrante che col manierismo mai sincera in come lo deve essere una parisienne come lei si proclama in tutto e per tutti…”

8 pages, 8vo, printed stationery of the Grand Hôtel de Londres, Paris, “Venerdi”, [October 1906]


Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Catalogue Note

A remarkable letter for its insights into the birth of one of the most popular operas in the repertory. This production in Paris included revisions demanded by Albert Carré and effectively represents the première of the opera in the form it is usually given today.  Parts of this letter are published in English in V. Seligman, Puccini among Friends (1938), pp.93-93.

Musical Manuscripts

|
London