223
223
Lully, Jean-Baptiste
CONTEMPORARY MANUSCRIPT FULL SCORE OF ATYS, THE COMPLETE TRAGÉDIE EN MUSIQUE IN FIVE ACTS
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 13,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
223
Lully, Jean-Baptiste
CONTEMPORARY MANUSCRIPT FULL SCORE OF ATYS, THE COMPLETE TRAGÉDIE EN MUSIQUE IN FIVE ACTS
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 13,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Musical Manuscripts

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London

Lully, Jean-Baptiste
CONTEMPORARY MANUSCRIPT FULL SCORE OF ATYS, THE COMPLETE TRAGÉDIE EN MUSIQUE IN FIVE ACTS
notated in dark brown ink on up to twelve staves per page, on systems of up to ten staves each, with the string parts in open score, with a few corrections and alterations, the title and final free endpaper inscribed in another hand ("Tragedie D Atys Mise En Musique par Monsieur Lully surintendant de la musique de sa Majesté" and "Langloys"), possibly by one of the original singers

314 pages, folio (38.5 x 25cm), 12-stave paper, grapes watermark (lettered "Closson" or "Conard"), contemporary mottled full calf, spine in compartments, red-gilt label ("Atys Tragedie"), a few tears to lower margins, occasional creasing and staining, rebacked with raised bands, largely retaining the old spine-compartments and endpapers


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Literature

P. Quinault, Atys: Tragédie en musique [libretto]...représentée devant Sa Majesté à Saint Germain en Laye, le 7me jour de Janvier 1682 (Paris: Ballard).

Catalogue Note

RARE: we have traced no manuscript full score of Atys at auction.  Schneider lists eight full score manuscripts outside France and twenty-six in all.  This was Lully's fourth tragédie lyrique, produced in 1676 and dubbed "the King's Opera" by Cerf de la Viéville.  The full score (318 pages) was published in 1689, which is also rare at auction, and an engraved reduced score (225 pages) in 1708.   Quinault's libretto was printed for the 1676 and 1682 productions, where "Langlois" is named several times as one of the choral singersAtys is notable amongst Lully's operas for its serious dramatic content, its tragic ending, and its exclusion of comic subplots.  Atys (haute-contre) is the favourite of Celaenus King of Phrygia, who is made insane on the orders of the goddess Cybele, and stabs himself to death.  Cybele transforms him into a pine tree in the final scene, which is closed by a choral divertissement mourning Atys's fate.  For Piccinni's setting of this plot, see lot 234.

Musical Manuscripts

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London