213
213
Chopin, Frédéric
FINE LARGE AUTOGRAPH ALBUM-LEAF OF THE OPENING OF THE ÉTUDE IN A-FLAT MAJOR OP.25 NO.1, SIGNED AND DATED ("FR. CHOPIN. PARIS, 10 MAI 1844")
Estimate
50,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 175,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
213
Chopin, Frédéric
FINE LARGE AUTOGRAPH ALBUM-LEAF OF THE OPENING OF THE ÉTUDE IN A-FLAT MAJOR OP.25 NO.1, SIGNED AND DATED ("FR. CHOPIN. PARIS, 10 MAI 1844")
Estimate
50,00060,000
LOT SOLD. 175,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Musical Manuscripts

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London

Chopin, Frédéric
FINE LARGE AUTOGRAPH ALBUM-LEAF OF THE OPENING OF THE ÉTUDE IN A-FLAT MAJOR OP.25 NO.1, SIGNED AND DATED ("FR. CHOPIN. PARIS, 10 MAI 1844")
the opening eight bars, notated for piano in brown ink on two systems, marked "All[egr]o moderato" and "dolce"

1 page, large oblong 4to (c.24 x 32cm), on a fine album-leaf with decorative gilt borders, verso blank, Paris, 18 May 1844, a few light stains 


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Catalogue Note

RARE. Only a few parts of Chopin's autograph manuscript of the Twelve Études op.25 survive and this fine expansive music manuscript is unrecorded by Kobylanska or elsewhere in the literature on the composer.  Of Chopin's autograph manuscript (Stichvorlage), only Études no.1, no.4 and no.8 still survive (1 & 8 in the National Library in Warsaw and no.4 in the Bibliothèque nationale, Paris; an earlier autograph in Warsaw exists only as a photocopy).  For the autograph title-page, see Sotheby's sale, 29 November 2016, lot 19.

This Étude was composed in 1836 and published the following year as the first of the op.25 set in Leipzig, Paris and London.  In the autograph manuscript in Warsaw, and in all three first editions, the tempo marking is "Allegro sostenuto", rather than "Allegro moderato" as here.   Schumann reviewed the op.25 Études and characterized this first number as a poem rather than a study, describing the extraordinary effect of a melody appearing from a continuous stream of arpeggios.  

"...Imagine an Aeolian harp possessing all the scales, and an artist's hand combining these with all kinds of fantastic embellishments, but always with an audible deep ground bass, and in the treble, a softly flowing cantilena...it would be a mistake to suppose that he allowed us to hear every one of its small notes. It was rather an undulation of the A-flat major chord...But, exquisitely entangled in the harmony, there ensued a wondrous melody in the large notes..." (Robert Schumann, On Music and Musicians, edited by Konrad Wolff, London, 1947, p. 136)

Musical Manuscripts

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London