40
40
Bernardo Strozzi
A STILL LIFE OF FLOWERS, FRUIT, VEGETABLES AND SEAFOOD ON A LEDGE, WITH A FIGURE HOLDING A PLATE OF CHERRIES AND A COCKEREL HANGING IN THE BACKGROUND
Estimate
200,000300,000
JUMP TO LOT
40
Bernardo Strozzi
A STILL LIFE OF FLOWERS, FRUIT, VEGETABLES AND SEAFOOD ON A LEDGE, WITH A FIGURE HOLDING A PLATE OF CHERRIES AND A COCKEREL HANGING IN THE BACKGROUND
Estimate
200,000300,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Master Paintings & Sculpture Evening Sale

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New York

Bernardo Strozzi
GENOA 1581 - 1644 VENICE
A STILL LIFE OF FLOWERS, FRUIT, VEGETABLES AND SEAFOOD ON A LEDGE, WITH A FIGURE HOLDING A PLATE OF CHERRIES AND A COCKEREL HANGING IN THE BACKGROUND

Provenance

Possibly the Duke of Mantua, Ferdinando Carlo Gonzaga (according to a 1709 inventory by Niccolò Cassana);
Anonymous sale, London, Christie's, 24 February 1984, lot 42 (as Follower of Andrea Belvedere).

Exhibited

Munich, Bayerische, Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Alte Pinakothek;
Berlin, Gemäldegalerie Staatliche Museen-Preussicher Kulturbesitz, Italian still life painting from three centuries, The Silvano Lodi Collection, 27 November 1984-27 October 1985 no. 30;
Jerusalem, The Israel Museum of Art, Italian still life painting from The Silvano Lodi collection, June 1994;
Tokyo, Seiji Togo Memorial Museum of Art, Italian still life painting from The Silvano Lodi collection, 28 April-26 May 2001, no. 15; 
Ravensburg, Schloss Achberg, Natura morta italiana: Italienische stilleben aus vier Jahrhunderten, Sammlung Silvano Lodi, 11 April-12 October 2003.

Literature

L. Salerno, Natura morta italiana 1560-1805, Rome 1984, pp. 140, 145, cat. no. 35.8;
L. Salerno, Natura morta italiana. La raccolta Silvano Lodi, Florence 1984, pp. 79-82, cat. no. 30;
B. Suida Manning, "Bernardo Strozzi as Painter of Still Life", in Apollo, CXXI, April 1985, pp. 248-52, reproduced fig. 6;
A. Cottino, "Bernardo Strozzi", in F. Zeri (ed.), La natura morta in Italia, vol. I, Milan 1989, pp. 119-21, cat. no. 115;
L. Salerno, Nuovi studi sulla natura morta italiana, Rome 1989, pp. 15 and 18, cat. no. 10;
M. Eidelberg and E.W. Rowlands, "The dispersal of the last Duke of Mantua's paintings", in Gazette des Beaux-Arts, 6th series, CXXIII, May-June 1994, p. 260, reproduced p. 258;
L. Mortari, Bernardo Strozzi, Rome 1995, p. 176, cat. no. 430;
P. Mould, Sleepers: In search of lost Old Masters, London 1995, pp. 50-54, reproduced figs. 13-15;
C. Manzitti, Bernardo Strozzi, Turin 2013, p. 244, cat. no. 390, reproduced in color plate XVIII.

Catalogue Note

Bernardo Strozzi’s impressive still life, first restored to the artist’s corpus by Luigi Salerno in 1984 (see Literature), is almost certainly identifiable as that mentioned in the 1709 inventory, compiled by Niccolo Cassana, of the collection of Ferdinando Carlo Gonzaga (1652-1708), the last Gonzaga to hold the title of Duke of Mantua. The painting reemerged at Christie’s, London in 1984 (see Provenance), where it was catalogued as the work of a follower of Andrea Belvedere. By this time, the painting had been overpainted, obscuring the figure, but was cleaned following its sale to reveal the original composition, including its protagonist, the gardener at the right. 

Luisa Mortari did not include this, nor any of Strozzi’s accomplished still lifes, in her initial monograph of 1966, but later published the work in her 1995 volume, alongside a number of other still lifes by the artist. The diaphanous blooms in this painting best compare to those in the artist’s Still Life with Roses, now in a Lugano private collection.1 Perhaps more compelling though is a comparison to his Market Scene with Two Figures, in the Stanley Moss Collection, Riverdale-on-Hudson.2 While neither the present painting nor The Market Scene are conventional still lifes, they demonstrate Strozzi’s natural aptitude and interest for the genre, in addition to that of his better-known figural depictions. The face of the figure in the present painting is characteristic of Strozzi’s hand, and the soft modelling of flesh and round appealing eyes recall those of the female figure in The Market Scene.

As Mortari asserts, rather than a painting from Strozzi’s late phase in Genoa, this still-life is more likely a work from the artist’s Venetian period.3 The painting reprises elements of Pietro Paolo Bonzi’s Woman with Vegetables in the State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburgh.4  Bonzi’s painting acquired by the Hermitage from the Barbarigo collection in Venice, where it may indeed have been seen by Strozzi during his sojourn in the city from 1630-1644.


1. See L. Mortari under literature, p. 176, cat. no. 428, reproduced.
2. Ibid, p.177, cat. no. 432, plate X, reproduced.
3. Ibid, p.176.
4. S. Vsevolozhskaya, 13th to 18th Century Italian Painting From the Hermitage Museum, Leningrad 1981, cat. no. 128.

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