Lot 1637
  • 1637

Jadeite and Gem Set Pendant

Estimate
200,000 - 300,000 HKD
Sold
725,000 HKD
bidding is closed

Description

  • Jadeite, Turquoise, Ruby, Sapphire, Yellow Gold
  • Buddha panel approximately 46.05 x 19.68 x 6.25mm; each Bodhisattva panel approximately 46.05 x 10.95 x 5.75mm.
Designed as a triptych, open to reveal a carved jadeite Buddha, flanked on each side by a carved jadeite bodhisattva panel, embellished with turquoise, rubies and sapphires, mounted in 18 karat yellow gold.

Catalogue Note

Accompanied by Hong Kong Jade & Stone Laboratory certificate numbered SJ 145867, dated 3 February 2017, stating that the jadeite tested is natural, known in the trade as "A Jade".

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Healing Divinity

Jadeite, a long revered symbol of supreme status and prosperous wealth, is also believed to possess health-strengthening properties and encourage longevity. A spiritual stone with significant meaning, it is often carved into symbolic figures that are intricately woven into the Chinese culture.

This piece inspired by the triptych art form, which found its origins in early Christian art, used as a popular presentation for altar paintings from the Middle Ages. Panels divided into three sections are hinged together that could be folded shut or displayed open. Commonly identified as a Christian altarpiece form, triptychs have since become increasingly popular with other religions and more recently, contemporary artists such as Zeng Fanzhi and Francis Bacon. In 2014, Bacon's 'Three Studies for Portrait of George Dyer (on Light Ground)' sold at Sotheby's London for USD45, 463, 700.

This distinctive triptych pendant opens to reveal the Medicine Buddha, also referred to as the Supreme Healer. Depicted in a canonical Buddha-like form holding a gallipot of medicine nectar, with his right hand extended gently over his right knee in a gesture called supreme generosity, he is attended by two bodhisattvas symbolising the light of the sun ("Suryaprabha") and the light of the moon ("Candraprabha") respectively. The use of a triptych to carve this intricate jadeite piece of Buddhist symbolism reflects the harmonious synergy between east and west, making it a rare collectable treasure for jadeite lovers.

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