3164
3164
An American Silver Two-Handled Urn, Henry Harland, Norwich, CT And New Orleans, circa 1830
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 5,625 USD
JUMP TO LOT
3164
An American Silver Two-Handled Urn, Henry Harland, Norwich, CT And New Orleans, circa 1830
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 5,625 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Iris Schwartz Collection of American Silver

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New York

An American Silver Two-Handled Urn, Henry Harland, Norwich, CT And New Orleans, circa 1830
with beaded borders, the spreading molded base with swirling acanthus chased band, the body with applied grapevine band, engraved on the front and back with slightly later presentation inscriptions, "To Mr. & Mrs. Milnor in token of Gratitude" and "From The Mother of Jane P. Lincoln Aug. 29th 1855"
marked on base HARLAND within a scroll, a star in a circle, D in a rectangle and psuedo English hallmarks
height 8 3/4 in.
22.2cm
31oz 8 dwt
977g
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Catalogue Note

Henry Harland (1789-1841) was born in Norwich, Connecticut, son of silversmith Thomas Harland.  He traveled regularly between New England and New Orleans.  An identical urn with a New Orleans inscription is in the Garvan collection at Yale University Art Gallery, see Wendy A. Cooper, Classical Taste in America 1800-1840, p. 245-246, fig. 198, and Crescent City Silver, no. 86, pp. 82-83.

The slightly later inscription on this piece appears to be associated with an early railroad disaster. From the Philadelphia Daily News, Aug. 30, 1855:

LAMENTABLE RAILROAD ACCIDENT - FEARFUL LOSS OF LIFE
It is our sad duty to record one of the most frightful railroad accidents that has ever accurred [sic] in this section of the country.  It took place yesterday morning, on the Camden and Amboy Railroad, about a mile above Burlington...
two of the cars were broken into fragments, and a third one was much injured.  In the two cars which were thus crushed scarcely a passenger escaped without serious injury, and many were taken out from the ruins lifeless...
Many of the citizens of Burlington... proceeded to the scene of the calamity and aided in the rescue of the wounded from the wreck.
THE KILLED...
Miss Jane P. Lincoln, of Ellicott's Mills, N.J. The deceased was killed instantly.  Her aged mother was at Burlington, and the news almost proved fatal to her.

The recipients have not been identified, but presumably aided either Miss Lincoln or her mother; there are numerous Milnors recorded in Burlington and Burlington County in the mid 19th century.

The Iris Schwartz Collection of American Silver

|
New York